Atopic dermatitis (eczema) – Mayo Clinic

Posted: March 12, 2018 at 8:42 pm

This post was added by Dr. Richardson


No lab test is needed to identify atopic dermatitis (eczema). Your doctor will likely make a diagnosis by examining your skin and reviewing your medical history. He or she may also use patch testing or other tests to rule out other skin diseases or identify conditions that accompany your eczema.

If you suspect a certain food caused your child’s rash, tell the doctor and ask about identifying potential food allergies.

Atopic dermatitis can be persistent. You may need to try various treatments over months or years to control it. And even if treatment is successful, signs and symptoms may return (flare).

It’s important to recognize the condition early so that you can start treatment. If regular moisturizing and other self-care steps don’t help, your doctor may suggest one or more of the following treatments:

Creams that control itching and help repair the skin. Your doctor may prescribe a corticosteroid cream or ointment. Apply it as directed, after you moisturize. Overuse of this drug may cause side effects, including thinning skin.

Other creams containing drugs called calcineurin inhibitors such as tacrolimus (Protopic) and pimecrolimus (Elidel) affect your immune system. They are used by people older than age 2 to help control the skin reaction. Apply it as directed, after you moisturize. Avoid strong sunlight when using these products.

These drugs have a black box warning about a potential risk of cancer. But the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology has concluded that the risk-to-benefit ratios of topical pimecrolimus and tacrolimus are similar to those of most other conventional treatments of persistent eczema and that the data don’t support the use of the black box warning.

Light therapy. This treatment is used for people who either don’t get better with topical treatments or who rapidly flare again after treatment. The simplest form of light therapy (phototherapy) involves exposing the skin to controlled amounts of natural sunlight. Other forms use artificial ultraviolet A (UVA) and narrow band ultraviolet B (UVB) either alone or with medications.

Though effective, long-term light therapy has harmful effects, including premature skin aging and an increased risk of skin cancer. For these reasons, phototherapy is less commonly used in young children and not given to infants. Talk with your doctor about the pros and cons of light therapy.

Treatment for eczema in babies (infantile eczema) includes:

See your baby’s doctor if these measures don’t improve the rash or if the rash looks infected. Your baby may need a prescription medication to control the rash or to treat an infection. Your doctor may also recommend an oral antihistamine to help lessen the itch and to cause drowsiness, which may be helpful for nighttime itching and discomfort.

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

To help reduce itching and soothe inflamed skin, try these self-care measures:

Atopic dermatitis can be especially stressful, frustrating or embarrassing for adolescents and young adults. It can disrupt their sleep and even lead to depression. And close family members of people with this condition may face financial, social and emotional problems.

Seek psychological support from counselors, support groups, friends or family.

You’re likely to start by seeing your family or primary care doctor. But in some cases when you call to set up an appointment, you may be referred to a specialist in skin diseases (dermatologist).

Here’s some information to help you prepare for your appointment.

For atopic dermatitis, some basic questions you might ask your doctor include:

Your doctor is likely to ask you several questions, including:

See original here:
Atopic dermatitis (eczema) – Mayo Clinic

Related Post
This entry was posted in Batten Disease Treatment. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.