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Category Archives: Eczema

5 All-Natural Remedies To Treat Eczema Without The Doctor – The Alternative Daily (blog)

Posted: August 14, 2017 at 3:48 am

Eczema is a skin condition where a section of the dermis become irritated, inflamed, itchy, flaky and occasionally blistered. It is surprisingly common in infants and children, but it is a problem that afflicts many teenagers and adults too.

There is no sure-fire cure, and eczema sometimes goes away on its own, but there are natural treatment options that can help reduce flare-ups. Here are some important things you need to know about eczema and treating it naturally.

The term basically refers to a variety of rash-like skin conditions. The symptoms of eczema include red, blotchy skin that is inflamed, irritated and itchy. Frequently, a person with the condition will scratch their skin incessantly, which can exacerbate pus-filled sores, flaking and scaly patches.

Scientists believe a number of different factors can cause or contribute to the condition. For example, heredity, allergens, autoimmune disorders, environmental irritants, hormones, stress and temperature can all play a role in precipitating eczema.

A susceptibility to eczema seems to run in families. However, sensitivity to detergents and common allergens can also induce symptoms. Likewise, hormonal changes linked to pregnancy, menstrual cycles and menopause have all been associated with eczema outbreaks too. Here is a list of common culprits:

Eczema is classified In many ways depending on the cause, the location on the body and the specific symptoms. For example, here are some common types of the condition:

Needless to say, the types of eczema can vary widely in terms of etiology and prognosis. However, promoting healthy skin is one of the safest and most effective ways alleviating eczema and restoring your skin to its optimal state. With that in mind, here are five all-natural remedies that will help you cope with the underlying factors that contribute to eczema.

Hempseed oil is a fixture in many body care products including shampoos, body lotions and moisturizers. Thats because the hemp plant is especially rich in omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, which are renowned for promoting healthy hair and skin growth.

In particular, omega-3 and omega-6 oils are natural moisturizers that prevent dryness while promoting lipid and collagen growth, which help rejuvenate your damaged dermal layers. In addition, omega-3 and omega-6 act as a natural sunscreen, which helps block harmful UV rays that can damage skin at the cellular level.

Hemp is a close cousin of the marijuana plant. So, its not surprising that Cannabis sativa would contain compounds that are extremely beneficial for the skin too. As it happens, THC and CBD have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, which promote healthy skin. However, smoking marijuana is not a good way of getting these compounds. Put simply, inhaling any plant-based smoke means breathing in hydrocarbons, which are not conducive to your skins health.

However, cannabis-based topicals such as lotions, creams, tinctures and oil are a terrific way of delivering the benefits of cannabinoids to your skin. Thats because endocannabinoid receptors are dispersed throughout the epidermis. Therefore, when you apply cannabis-based topicals you are delivering natural cannabinoids most notably THC and CBD directly to the endocannabinoid receptors in the skin.

To begin with, THC and CBD are natural anti-inflammatory agents. Therefore, they quickly act to reduce swelling and pus at the cellular level. Second, cannabinoids are potent antimicrobials. Consequently, they naturally combat bacteria, fungi and other microorganisms that can cause skin infections. Finally, THC and CBD are powerful antioxidants. Indeed, cannabinoids contain higher levels of free radical scavengers than vitamins A, C and E. As a result, cannabis-based topicals help counteract genetic damage at the cellular level that diminishes skin health.

In a landmark study on cannabis and skin care, a team of scientists led by Dr. Gerald Weissmann found that cannabis-based topicals promote healthy lipid production, which is critical for regulation of dry skin and counteracting many epidermal disorders.

According to Dr. Weissman, the latest research shows that we may have something in common with the marijuana plant. Just as THC is believed to protect the marijuana plants from pathogens, our own cannabinoids may be necessary for us to maintain healthy skin and to protect us from pathogens.

This view is echoed by Phytecs, a consortium of scientists investigating how foods and other natural substances support endocannabinoid health. Summing up their research they wrote, Endocannabinoids regulate skin inflammation, oil production and even play a role in unwanted hair growth. Skin care products that target the endocannabinoid system are likely to be a fundamental element of next-generation cosmetic treatments.

Aloe vera gel has been used as a skin care remedy for centuries. It has most often been used to treat sunburn and psoriasis, but there is a lot of anecdotal evidence that it can help treat eczema too.

In particular, when applied topically to the skin, aloe vera gel helps deliver a cooling and soothing sensation, which can reduce the urge to itch. In addition, compounds in aloe vera gel have both hydrating and anti-inflammatory properties. The former creates a humectant effect, which may counteract the dryness and flakiness of the outermost epidermal barrier that is often associated with eczema.

The scientific evidence that aloe vera can treat eczema still remains scant, but it has been used safely for centuries as a topical remedy to relieve symptoms associated with dry, broken or irritated skin.

Coconut oil is rich in lipids. Therefore, it helps fill in intercellular space in your skin, which can lead to moisture loss. Coconut oil is especially well-suited to treating eczema for several other reasons too. To begin with, it has immuno-modulating properties. Therefore, it can detoxify histamines, which contributes to skin inflammation, but without any of the negative side-effects associated with cortisone creams or ointments.

In addition, coconut oil is rich in fatty acids that strengthen the connective tissue in your skin. Finally, coconut oil is rich in lauric acid, which helps the skin resist bacteria, fungi and other microorganisms.

Chamomile tea is known to relax the mind, but what about your skin? In fact, chamomile contains traces of a natural alcohol known as bisabolol which has antimicrobial anti-inflammatory properties.

To soothe your skin, try taking a chamomile tea bath. Youll need four chamomile tea bags (or four teaspoons of dried chamomile tied inside a cheesecloth bag). Run warm water from your bathtub faucet for ten to fifteen minutes over chamomile tea. Next, steep yourself in this calming brew. The natural compounds in chamomile should reduce itchiness, fight germs and lessen inflammation too.

Theres no cure-all for eczema that works for everybody all the time. Thats because eczema is a complex condition with many contributing factors. However, there are a number of all-natural remedies that can help you alleviate eczema symptoms while promoting healthier skin. Hopefully, by understanding how these natural compounds work you can discover the ones that work best for you.

Scott OReilly

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Dermira Commits $135M for Global Rights to Roche Eczema Drug – Xconomy

Posted: August 12, 2017 at 10:45 pm

Xconomy San Francisco

Skin treatments developer Dermira is adding another experimental drug to its pipeline that it plans to test as a potential treatment for eczema, through a deal announced this morning with healthcare giant Roche.

But in picking up the global rights to lebrikizumab, Menlo Park, CA-based Dermira (NASDAQ: DERM) is entering a suddenly crowded field of new treatments for the skin condition, which is characterized by inflamed, itchy, and scaly rashes on the skin. Dermira has agreed to pay Roche $80 million now, plus $55 million next year for global rights to the drug. If Dermira can hit development and regulatory goals for the lebrikizumab, the company could be on the hook to pay Roche up to $250 million more.

Should Dermira commercialize the injectable drug in other diseases, the company would have to pay more than $1 billion as the drug hits undisclosed sales marks. Dermira would also need to pay Roche royalties on the drugs sales. Roche is keeping the rights to the drug in interstitial lung diseases, a group of disorders that lead to progressive scarring of the lungs.

Eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is an autoimmune disorder that produces an inflammatory response thats visible on the skin. The condition affects at least 28 million people in the United States, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. Lebrikizumab is a monoclonal antibody drug that targets interleukin 13, a protein associated with inflammation.

Other pharmas are aiming to address the eczema market with new drugs. Last December, the FDA approved Pfizers (NYSE: PFE) topical ointment crisaborole (Eucrisa) as a treatment for mild-to-moderate eczema. That drug, which blocks the inflammatory enzyme PDE4, came to Pfizer through its $5.2 billion acquisition of Anacor Pharmaceuticals last year. Meanwhile, Tarrytown, NY-based Regeneron Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ: REGN) received FDA approval in March for its moderate-to-severe eczema drug dupilumab (Dupixent). Like the Roche drug, dupilumab targets interleukin 13.

Dermira and Roche expect to close the licensing deal later this quarter. In early 2018, Dermira plans to start a Phase 2b dose-ranging study, enrolling patients who have moderate-to-severe eczema. The goal of the trial is to find the best dose for a larger Phase 3 clinical trial. Dermira said it expects that it will spend approximately $200 million to get the early results for the Phase 2b study.

Photo by Flicker user Oregon State Universityvia a Creative Commons license.

Frank Vinluan is editor of Xconomy Raleigh-Durham, based in Research Triangle Park. You can reach him at fvinluan [at] xconomy.com

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Does Early Probiotic Supplementation Reduce Eczema, Asthma Development? – Monthly Prescribing Reference (registration)

Posted: at 10:45 pm

Probiotics in first six months of life do not reduce incidence of eczema at age 2, asthma at age 5

HealthDay News Probiotic administration during the first six months of life does not reduce the incidence of eczema at 2 years of age or asthma at 5 years of age, according to a study published online August 7 in Pediatrics.

Michael D. Cabana, MD, MPH, from the University of California in San Francisco, and colleagues conducted a randomized trial of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) supplementation on the cumulative incidence of eczema and asthma and rhinitis in high-risk infants. Ninety-two intervention infants received a daily dose of 10 billion colony-forming units of LGG and 225mg of insulin for the first 6 months of life, while 92 control infants received 325mg insulin alone for the first 6 months of life.

The researchers found that the estimated cumulative incidence of eczema was 30.9 and 28.7% in the control and LGG arms at 2 years of age, respectively, for a hazard ratio of 0.95 (95% confidence interval, 0.59 to 1.53). The cumulative incidence of asthma was 17.4 and 9.7% in the control and LGG arms at age 5 years, respectively, for a hazard ratio of 0.88 (95% confidence interval, 0.41 to 1.87).

“For high-risk infants, early LGG supplementation for the first six months of life does not appear to prevent the development of eczema or asthma at 2 years of age,” the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to the biopharmaceutical and nutrition industries.

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3 Natural Ways To Manage Eczema – Reports Healthcare

Posted: August 8, 2017 at 1:44 pm

Eczema is a prevalent disease caused usually by allergens in food, perfumes, hair and skincare products for most people. A number of cases have had the disorder because of slow and poor digestions as well as gut related problems such as Leaky Gut Syndrome.

While an eczema attacks can occur due to any sudden exposure to a certain type of chemicals or any type of substance, studies have shown that genetics and allergies have been more responsible for most of the incidences.

This is why people are usually diagnosed with eczema at very young ages or as toddlers. People with genetic eczema mostly have it in visible spots such as the cheeks, chin, arms, and legs. For adults and teenagers, it is less likely to happen on the face and is usually observed to be in the back, chest or ankles.

Eczema can be easily spotted because of its reddish, itchy rashes though these marks vary from person to person depending on factors such as the skin type of the particular person. For example, people with dry and sensitive skins have cracked and blister-filled spots while people with oily skin with have a paler tone of red in their spots.

Nevertheless, it is the redness of the eczema rashes that make them easy to be diagnosed as well as the chronic itch that comes with it. Itching induced by this disease can be so chronic that it can make the rashes bleed which further damages the skin.Some researchers have shown that eczema is not a single condition but a combination of various skin problems that have similar symptoms. These different types of eczemas are based on their causes. The most commonly detected ones are:

What are the symptoms of Eczema?Symptoms of Eczema can vary in terms of being chronic or acute. Signs such as redness and cracking tend to occur periodically, usually in response to fluctuating immunity in the specific person or rise in stress levels.

Some of these signs might even go away, leaving behind no spots for several weeks or even years, but they are usually reoccurring and the patients are likely to suffer repeatedly and often in a more severe form if the condition is not treated properly. Though different types of eczema might come with unique symptoms, the most commonly shared ones are:

Conventional Treatments for EczemaA proper cure for eczema really does not exist. Dermatologist instead recommends a routine that can avoid intensification of eczema effects and manage its symptoms which usually consists of avoiding products that can be hard on the skin and daily, mild cleansing.Sometimes these routines can include changes in daily food intake, especially in cases of allergic eczema to lower chances of coming in contact with those allergens in normal meals without knowing.

When professional help and medication becomes a necessity, skin creams can often give to eczema patients to reduce the dryness in the skin and moisturize. An example of this can be steroid creams or Corticosteroid that can control itchiness in the skin and stop a patient from hurting eczema affected parts.

Pimecrolimus and Tacrolimus are used as a substitute for patients whose skin have become too sensitive or is just not suited to handle steroids from Corticosteroid.

The use of skin-sensitive products is recommended by most dermatologists even at the very first symptoms of eczema. Skincare and hair products, in accordance with studies, contribute greatly to eczema as synthetic smells and their chemical-rich formulas can irritate the skin greatly.Companies have therefore developed eczema-special medicated products that do not contribute to the severity of eczema in any other way.

What Can You do to Prevent Eczema?Although most people prefer seeking professional help for eczema, there are a number of ways the severity of eczema can be controlled at home, reducing chances of more harm. Simple changes in habits that can manage this skin disorder include:

Natural home remedies and treatments can always help in managing eczema even if one prefers help from a doctor. In fact, for better health and fast improvement in severe eczema, a combination of both can do wonders if done properly.

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Taking too many antibiotics to treat eczema may worsen your condition – Miami Herald

Posted: August 6, 2017 at 1:42 am

Recently, dermatologists and medical students from across the nation attended the 37th Annual Advances in Dermatology meeting held at New York University. Dr. Seth Orlow, chairman of the Department of Dermatology at New York University School of Medicine, presented on the connection between atopic dermatitis, more commonly known as eczema, and the skins complex microbiome.

One key aspect of Orlows presentation involved the often misunderstood relationship between eczema and a specific strain of bacteria called Staphylococcus aureus.

Numerous studies have found that people with eczema nearly always have a much higher concentration of S. aureus bacteria living on their skin than those without this common condition. In fact, the more severe the eczema, the greater the amount of S. aureus that seems to be present on the skin.

These findings lead many to believe that this bacteria causes eczema but this can lead to overuse of irritating antibacterial soaps and overuse of antibiotics. Orlow tells Dermatology Times that focusing on S. aureus as the sole cause of atopic dermatitis is problematic, as the more likely scenario is that the underlying inflammation of this skin condition is what leads to an overabundance of S. aureus colonization on the skin.

As a result, treating eczema with aggressive rounds of oral or topical antibiotics to get rid of this bacteria could do more harm than good in the long run because these treatments are not generally effective and contribute to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance all over the country.

Fortunately, research on the most effective medications for eczema continue to uncover potentially groundbreaking possibilities for future treatment methods. Current studies are examining the use of probiotics, or good bacteria, to help diversify the skins microbiome in people with eczema, which helps protect the skin from pathogenic bacteria. (NBC News). The hope is that by normalizing the skins microbiome, probiotics will help alleviate eczema symptoms and minimize the incidence of future flare-ups.

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Eczema and psoriasis treatment: THIS therapy could reduce the need for creams and tablets – Express.co.uk

Posted: at 1:42 am

Now, experts have said routine prescribing of UV light treatment for severe skin conditions could significantly reduce the use of steroid creams and tablets, according to new research from the University of Dundee.

Patients who experience the most severe forms of diseases such as psoriasis or eczema can find their lives affectged by their conditions.

Steroid creams are frequently prescribed but these can cause quite serious side effects and can prove inadequate to bring the disease under control.

In such instances patients may be referred to a dermatologist for more intensive treatment, which may take the forms of pills, injections or filtered UV light, known as phototherapy.

Experts from Dundee Universitys School of Medicine, examined the outcomes of 1800 patients with severe psoriasis who received UV treatment over a six-year period.

They found that three-quarters of patients experienced significant improvements in their condition and that the need for steroid creams was reduced by 25 per cent.

Phototherapy involves safe, controlled delivery of narrow wavebands of ultraviolet radiation in specially constructed cabins.

It has been known to help skin disease sufferers for decades but this study is the first to demonstrate that its use can reduce the need for steroids in the treatment of psoriasis in routine practice and not just in a short-term clinical study.

Importantly, the findings also suggest that many patients can delay or avoid altogether the need for oral or injection treatments which can cause side effects such as gastric upset, liver dysfunction and infections.

Physicians have been using phototherapy or even direct sunlight to treat skin conditions for 50 years, said Dr Foerster.

We know that it helps patients with psoriasis and eczema but until now we did not know that it actually causes a reduction in the use of steroid creams and can reduce the need for patients to have their conditions controlled by tablets or injections.

These can work very well but can also have a downside.

The form of treatment we are talking about is targeted, non-dangerous exposure to filtered light to treat skin conditions that are so severe that they cant be contained with creams.

We were able to exploit a uniquely complete set of anonymised prescribing records that exists in Tayside and found that there was a very significant reduction in the amount of steroid cream prescribed to people who underwent phototherapy for up to 12 months after their treatment.

Access to phototherapy across the UK largely depends on a patients location.

Sadly phototherapy is not equally available around the UK, said Dr Foerster.

Tablet treatments can be effective and safe with proper monitoring but it would be fantastic if everyone had the opportunity to try something that circumvents the need for any laboratory monitoring in the first place.

There are other risks resulting from a lack of access to phototherapy.

Sufferers of psoriasis or eczema may take matters into their own hands and seek out a sun-filled holiday or use sun beds.

I have seen this on several occasions and it brings with it the many well-known dangers arising from skin exposure.

The research is published in the journal PLOS ONE.

FIVE TIPS TO BEAT PSORIASIS

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How to get rid of eczema, beat the itch and scratch cycle – The Standard

Posted: August 4, 2017 at 3:44 am

If you suffer from eczema, then all that itching is making you scratch

ALSO READ: The common activities done best on an EMPTY stomach – and having sex is one of them

If you suffer from eczema, then all that itching is making you scratch. Here are a few tips on how to get rid of eczema and some treatments.

According to statistics the number of eczema cases being reported has risen 40 per cent in the past four years.

Whether you are unfortunate enough to be born with the skin condition or you develop it in later life, eczema can be painful, embarrassing and debilitating.

What can be done to get your skin back on track? Here are our tips from the health experts

What is eczema?

Eczema close-up

Eczema is red, flaky and itchy skin, which will often crack and weep. The most common type of eczema is atopic (caused by allergies), but people may suffer from contact eczema (flare-ups after touching allergens such as nickel or rubber), discoid (which occurs in coin-shaped patches), or seborrheic (eczema of the scalp).

ALSO READ: 5 Easy Detox drinks to help with weight loss that you can easily fix at home for yourself

Atopic eczema is in your genes, and often goes hand-in-hand with hay fever and asthma.

“You can send eczema into remission, but youll always have it its a case of whether you have symptoms or not,” says GP Dr Rob Hicks . “The aim of the treatment is to keep people free from flare-ups.”

Although you may be genetically predisposed to eczema, it can only be set off by a trigger, which could be anything from nuts to dog hair, wool to cigarette smoke, and establishing what it is, is key to treatment.The best way to treat eczema is moisturising

1. Don’t scratch

Breaking the itch-scratch cycle is vital for recovery. “Scratching may bring temporary relief to the itch, but it actually triggers the release of a chemical called histamine which just causes more itching,” says Dr Rob.

Scratching damages the skin and may allow bacteria that normally lives on the surface to get in and cause infection. Keep nails short, and whenever you get the urge to have a scratch, massage the itchy area with moisturiser using the pads of your fingertips.

2. Slather on the cream

ALSO READ: Note to pregnant women: Eat more omena and avocadoThe best way to treat eczema is moisturising

Most people will need to try a few treatments before they find one that works for them. The best way to treat eczema is moisturising. “You need to grease yourself up like a cross-Channel swimmer!” says GP Dr Matt Piccaver . “Cover your body with moisturiser morning and night, and keep a pot in your bag to top up during the day.”

Your doctor can prescribe different emollients, but not all of them will work for everyone. Apply after a shower when the skins still damp to help trap in moisture. Do this rigorously, even when you dont have symptoms.

Dont panic if your favourite cream stops working you may need to switch between a couple of brands.

3. Visit the Doctor

For cases of severe eczema, your doctor may refer you to a dermatologist who can prescribe steroid cream, special bandages and wet wraps, or even ultraviolet light therapy.

Although steroids may have nasty side-effects if used long term, a short course is perfectly safe. If left untreated, severe eczema can cause lichenification, which causes the skin to become thick and leathery.

Dr Robs best treatment for a child suffering from eczema? “I recommend the parent gives the child a big hug to show that contact wont hurt them. All too often people are frightened to touch sufferers because theyre worried about causing them pain, or of catching it but eczema is not contagious,” says Dr Rob.

4. Go naturalTake a couple of handfuls of oatbran and pop it in a muslin bag or old pair of tights

There are plenty of ways you can soothe your skin naturally. Make sure your sheets are cotton, which is kinder to the skin than synthetic materials you could even try wearing cotton gloves at night to prevent scratching. Oatbran has been used for centuries to treat skin conditions.

“Take a couple of handfuls of oatbran and pop it in a muslin bag or old pair of tights. Add the bag to your bath, or hang it from your showerhead to soothe sore skin,” says Dr Matt.

If a bath full of porridge doesnt appeal, try aloe vera gel keep it in the fridge so its cool and refreshing, or drink aloe vera juice. Coconut oil is favoured by many sufferers choose an organic, cold pressed variety and rub onto damp skin.

There is often a link with your state of mind and your skin, so set aside time to relax. It is common for eczema to flare up during stressful periods, such as a break-up or starting a new job. “Find ways to reduce stress, such as meditation, yoga or therapy,” says nutritionist to the stars Kim Pearson . “Its also important to get enough sleep.”

5. Watch out for Food triggers

Food allergies or sensitivities can be a common trigger for many eczema sufferers. Cows milk is a well-known culprit, but other common problem foods include eggs, soya and wheat.

Kim Pearson suggests considering a food elimination diet, which involves cutting out common trigger foods for a period of time and then gradually reintroducing them to see if they cause a flare-up.

“Certain foods can promote inflammation its worth trying to reduce your intake of sugar, refined carbohydrates, and highly processed and deep-fried foods,” she says. Keep a symptom and food diary to see if you can establish any links between what you eat and the state of your eczema.

For happy skin, make sure you eat plenty of foods that are rich in omega 3 fatty acids, such as oily fish, flaxseeds and walnuts. “Opt for low glycemic, whole carbohydrate sources such as oats, quinoa and sweet potato, as well as low-sugar fruits such as berries, apples and pears,” says Kim. All types of eczema can potentially be improved by changes in diet.

6. Stress

Stress is not always something we consider as a cause of eczema. More often than not we look for external sources like the clothes we wear. But stress can trigger a number of different issues in our body, eczema being just one of them.

Here are a few simple ways to lower your stress levels

Walk more

Have a bedtime bath

Slow your life down

Take a deep breath

Escape life by reading a book, playing a computer game

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Eczema can be worse for adults – Health24

Posted: August 1, 2017 at 12:43 am

Many people believe that eczema mainly occurs in childhood and is likely to clear up as a child grows older. However, this itchy skin condition sometimes takes a heavier toll on adults than children, an expert says.

According to a Health24 article, eczema is a chronic skin disease caused by inflammation of the skin and its inability to retain adequate moisture.

The result is a dry and very troublesome rash and intense itching, which may occur on almost any part of the body.

‘It’s not just eczema’

“Adult eczema patients may have dealt with their symptoms for their entire lives, which can be draining, or they may experience symptoms for the first time as adults, which can be a difficult adjustment,” said Dr Jonathan Silverberg, an assistant professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

“Either way, this condition can take a real toll on them,” added Dr Silverberg, who is also a director of Northwestern’s Multidisciplinary Eczema Center. Some people mistakenly regard eczema as a childhood disease and not a serious health problem for adults, he said.

“People who aren’t familiar with the disease might say, ‘It’s just eczema.’ But for many patients, it’s not ‘just eczema’. It can be debilitating,” Dr Silverberg said in a news release from the American Academy of Dermatology.

A close-up example of an eczema rash on the skin.

The intense itching and dry, red patches of skin can make daily tasks and physical activities difficult, he said. Some evidence suggests it leads to poorer job performance, disrupts sleep, and contributes to mental health problems such as anxiety and depression, he explained.

Eczema is not contagious

Also, someone with visible eczema may feel social stigma if others incorrectly believe the disease is contagious or associated with poor hygiene, Dr Silverberg said.

“Fortunately for patients, treatment can help alleviate the negative effects of this disease and improve their physical and mental well-being,” he added.

Treatment regimens include topical steroids, moisturisers, phototherapy or systemic medications.

Also, the US Food and Drug Administration recently approved two new eczema treatments: an anti-inflammatory topical medication for mild to moderate conditions and an injectable drug for tougher cases, according to Dr Silverberg.

Images supplied by iStock

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Eczema Can Take a Toll on Adults – WebMD

Posted: July 31, 2017 at 5:45 am

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, July 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) — The itchy, rashy skin condition eczema sometimes takes a heavier toll on adults than children, an expert says.

“Adult eczema patients may have dealt with their symptoms for their entire lives, which can be draining, or they may experience symptoms for the first time as adults, which can be a difficult adjustment,” said Dr. Jonathan Silverberg, an assistant professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

“Either way, this condition can take a real toll on them,” added Silverberg, director of Northwestern’s Multidisciplinary Eczema Center.

Some people mistakenly regard eczema as a childhood disease and not a serious health problem for adults, he said.

“People who aren’t familiar with the disease might say, ‘It’s just eczema.’ But for many patients, it’s not ‘just eczema.’ It can be debilitating,” Silverberg said in a news release from the American Academy of Dermatology.

The intense itching and dry, red patches of skin can make daily tasks and physical activities difficult, he said. Some evidence suggests it leads to poorer job performance, disrupts sleep, and contributes to mental health problems such as anxiety and depression, he explained.

Also, someone with visible eczema may feel social stigma if others incorrectly believe the disease is contagious or associated with poor hygiene, Silverberg said.

“Fortunately for patients, treatment can help alleviate the negative effects of this disease and improve their physical and mental well-being,” he added.

Treatment regimens include topical steroids, moisturizers, phototherapy or systemic medications. Also, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently approved two new eczema treatments: an anti-inflammatory topical medication for mild to moderate conditions and an injectable drug for tougher cases, according to Silverberg.

WebMD News from HealthDay

SOURCE: American Academy of Dermatology, news release, July 27, 2017

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Fear keeps many eczema patients from using steroid creams – Reuters

Posted: at 5:45 am

(Reuters Health) – Many people with eczema, a common skin disease, may avoid creams and ointments that can help ease symptoms like itching and inflammation because theyre afraid to try topical corticosteroids, a recent study suggests.

Eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, usually develops in early childhood and often runs in families. Scaly, itchy rashes are the main symptoms. The condition can be treated using moisturizers, avoiding certain soaps and other irritants and with prescription creams and ointments containing corticosteroids to relieve itching.

For the study, researchers examined results from 16 previously published studies and found as many as four in five people were afraid to use corticosteroids for eczema. Between one third and one half of people who were prescribed steroid creams but also expressed concerns about them did not adhere to the treatment – meaning they didnt use the creams and missed out on their benefits.

Steroids have developed a bad reputation because of the potential side effects that come with improper or chronic use of high-potency steroids, said senior study author Dr. Richard Antaya, director of pediatric dermatology at Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut.

Common side effects of corticosteroids can include stretch marks as well as thinning, thickening or darkening of the skin. Less often, these steroids can cause acne or infected hair follicles or more serious side effects in the eyes like glaucoma and cataracts.

The resistance to using topical corticosteroids is definitely partly driven by the confusion over the adverse effects of long term use of high potency steroids versus those of short term use of low potency steroids, Antaya said by email. The risks from using short-term low potency steroids are vastly lower.

For the study, Antaya and colleagues examined studies published from 1946 to 2016 that surveyed patients and caregivers about their opinions of topical corticosteroids. The studies included in the analysis were done in Australia, Canada, Croatia, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Mexico, the Netherlands, Poland, Singapore and the U.S.

Two studies compared how often patients used these medicines based on whether or not they had phobias.

In one of these studies, 49 percent of people with phobias didnt adhere to a prescribed steroid cream, compared with 14 percent of patients without concerns. In the second study, 29 percent of people with phobias didnt use their steroid cream, compared with 10 percent of patients who werent worried.

Five of the studies in the analysis looked at why people had phobias and found skin thinning was the most frequent concern, followed by fear that steroids might affect growth and development. Some previous research has found long-term use at high doses may impact growth and development in children.

Limitations of the study include the wide variety of phobia definitions used across the 16 smaller studies in the analysis, the authors note in JAMA Dermatology.

Even so, the findings add to evidence that phobias keep many parents in many parts of the world from using corticosteroids to treat their children with eczema, said Dr. Saxon Smith, a dermatologist at the School of Medicine at the University of Sydney in Australia.

It is critical to recognize the high frequency of fears patients and parents have about using topical corticosteroids, Smith, who wasnt involved in the study, said by email.

Left untreated, eczema doesnt just leave kids itchy, Smith said. Itchy and discomfort can be so severe that kids dont sleep at night, impacting normal development and socialization.

Too often we see infants who suffer and have not slept for months and parents exhausted just because they have wrong fear or beliefs about the treatment or the disease and dont treat their child, Dr. Helene Aubert-Wastiaux, a dermatologist at Nantes University Hospital in France who wasnt involved in the study, said by email.

SOURCE: bit.ly/2tZvKrU JAMA Dermatology, online July 19, 2017.

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Fear keeps many eczema patients from using steroid creams – Reuters

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