Page 11234..1020..»

Category Archives: MS Treatment

MS-UK | Study of gut bacteria may lead to future treatment …

Posted: December 13, 2017 at 1:40 am

According to a study conducted at the Mayo Clinic in America, a human gut bacteria discovered by researchers may help treat autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS).

The Mayo research team worked with researchers from the University of lowa to test gut microbial samples from patients on a mouse model of MS. They tested three strains of bacteria, but one microbe, called Prevotella histicola, particularly stood out because its ability to effectively supress immune disease in the preclinical MS model.

Researchers discovered that Prevotella histicola, which is cultured from the human intestine, caused a decrease in two types of pro-inflammatory cells. It was also found to increase families of cells that fight disease, such as T-cells, dendritic cells and a type of macrophage.

Joseph Murray, M.D., a Mayo Clinic Gastroenterologist and Senior Author of the article, said: If we can use the microbes already in the human body to treat human disease beyond the gut itself, we may be onto a new era of medicine. We are talking about bugs as drugs. Dr. Murray coined the term brug to refer to this approach.

Although this discovery is in the very early stages and is not yet a proven treatment, researchers concluded that this type of gut bacteria may play a role in treating MS, but believe further study is needed.

Date: 10/08/17

Source: MS-UK

Read more from the original source:
MS-UK | Study of gut bacteria may lead to future treatment …

Posted in MS Treatment | Comments Off on MS-UK | Study of gut bacteria may lead to future treatment …

Multiple sclerosis vs. fibromyalgia: Similarities, differences and treatments – Herald Palladium

Posted: August 10, 2017 at 3:41 pm

There is no known cure for fibromyalgia or multiple sclerosis.Both are life-altering and have similar symptoms.

New advancements in science and technology have producednew treatments and exercises that can help remedy symptoms of these disorders.

Similarities and differences in symptoms

Multiple sclerosis and fibromyalgia are similar, yetdifferent, diseases. Theyhave similar symptoms, which can make a proper diagnosis difficult.

According to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, 400,000 Americans currently suffer from MS. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 4million Americans havefibromyalgia.

Women are two to three times more likely to develop MS or fibromyalgia than men, according to reports from the CDC and healthline.com.

Overlapping symptoms include chronic pain, chronic fatigue, depression, anxiety, headaches, systemic lupus, rheumatoid arthritis and memory issues.

In addition to these symptoms, both have uniquesymptoms. A person with fibromyalgia may experience mood swings, sleep disorders and nausea, while those with MS can havedifficulty walking, slurred speech and vision problems.

Diagnosis

Currently, there is little known about fibromyalgia other than it is a musculoskeletal disease that increases a persons sensitivity to pain. Itwas not considered to be a disease by the American Medical Association until 1987, which contributes to the more limited research.

A New York Times report indicated doctors will perform a pressure-point test onthose who are suspected ofhaving fibromyalgia.If the patient experiences unbearable pain inat least halfof the 18 pressure points,and the patient has been experiencing consistent pain for more than three months, he or shewill most likely be diagnosed with fibromyalgia.

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease in whichthe bodys immune system attacks the central nervous system and destroys myelin, a protective coating that surrounds the nerves.

Multiple sclerosis is diagnosed through a neurological exam and various tests, including an MRI, evoked potentials and spinal fluid analysis.

If a brain lesion is found through testing, a person will likely be diagnosed with MS and undergo treatment by a physician.

Treatments and advancements

Some treatments for MS and fibromyalgia are the same, including pain medications, acupuncture and physical therapy.

According to belmarrahealth.com, lifestyle changes also can help remedy symptoms of both diseases. Changes include exercise, such as low-impact swimming and weightlifting, yoga, walking and stretching. Reducing caffeine intake, reducing stress, improving ones sleep schedule and having a healthy diet also may help.

For MS patients in particular, websites such as mybraingames.com and the Lumosityapp may helpincrease cognitive function and reduce memory loss.

In March, a drug called Ocrevus was approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat relapsing-remitting MS, which is the most common type. In a trial of 1,600 volunteers, the drug cut relapses in MS patients in half when compared to the drug Rebif, another common MS treatment that has been on the market since 2002.

Ocrevus is given to patients every six months by injection and targets B-cells, a type of immune cell that countermeasures MS.

Because the notoriety of fibromyalgia is becoming more prevalent, scientists are looking into multiple methods of treatment.

Until recently, drugs such as Lyrica and antidepressants Cymbalta and Savella were the only prescription medication that had been approved for fibromyalgia treatment, according to nationalpainreport.com. However, in recent years, the same report indicated marijuana has been approved as a treatment for fibromyalgia patients in states where the drug is legal for medicinal use.

The National Pain Foundation conducted a study in 2014 of 1,300 people who take prescription drugs for fibromyalgia. In the study, patients were asked to try marijuana and compare the effectiveness of pain relief to their current medication.

While using marijuana for medical treatment maystill be controversial, the study found that62 percent of participants said the treatment was very effective in treating their symptoms while 33 percent said it helped a little. Fivepercent said it did not help at all.

Excerpt from:
Multiple sclerosis vs. fibromyalgia: Similarities, differences and treatments – Herald Palladium

Posted in MS Treatment | Comments Off on Multiple sclerosis vs. fibromyalgia: Similarities, differences and treatments – Herald Palladium

TG Therapeutics, FDA Agree on Phase 3 Program to Evaluate Relapsing MS Therapy TG-1101 – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Posted: at 3:41 pm

TG Therapeuticsand the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have agreed on a special protocol assessment for a Phase 3 trial program evaluating TG-1101 (ublituximab)to potentially treatrelapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS).

A special protocol assessment (SPA) is a procedure by which the agency officially evaluates the design and size of proposed protocols meant to ground a new drug application (NDA). The SPA marks the conditions under which the trial design adequately addresses objectives that, if met, will support consequent regulatory submission for approval of TG-1101.

Stanford Universitys Dr. Lawrence Steinman will lead the program, which is expected to begin this year. Itincludes two Phase 3 clinical trials (ULTIMATE I and ULTIMATE II) both randomized, double-blind, active-controlled studies comparing TG-1101 to Aubagio (teriflunomide) in patients with relapsing MS.

By targeting relapsing MS, TG-1101 could potentially be approved to two particular forms of the disease:relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and secondary progressive MS (SPMS), which often follows RRMS.

TG-1101 is TGs novel glyco-engineered monoclonal antibody that targets a specific and unique epitope on the CD20 proteinfound on mature B-cells. The primary endpoint of the trials will be changes inannualized relapse rate after 96 weeks of treatment in about 440 randomized patients in each trial.

B-cell targeted therapy with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies has been shown to be very active in the treatment of multiple sclerosis, and with the recent approval of ocrelizumab, we have entered a new era of B-cell targeted therapy for MS, Steinman said in a press release.

Ocrevus (ocrelizumab) is a humanizedmonoclonal antibody that targets B-cells with the CD20 molecule. The FDAapprovedit on March 28, 2017,as an MS treatment.

The Phase 2 data recently presented for ublituximab demonstrates an encouraging safety and efficacy profile in the treatment of MS with this novel glyco-engineered anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, said Steinman. We believe the unique attributes of ublituximab in particular the rapid infusion times and potential pricing advantages may provide added convenience and enhance patient care and access over currently available therapies.

Michael S. Weiss, TGs executive chairman and CEO, said the New York-based pharma company hopes this Phase 3 program will establish TG-1101 as an important new drug in the treatment of MS.

The early data from our Phase 2 clinical trial, the highly successful pivotal results for the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody ocrelizumab in MS, and the substantial safety data generated in our oncology program, gives us a high level of confidence in the potential for a successful outcome, he said. We look forward to enrolling our first patient before the end of the summer.

See the original post:
TG Therapeutics, FDA Agree on Phase 3 Program to Evaluate Relapsing MS Therapy TG-1101 – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Posted in MS Treatment | Comments Off on TG Therapeutics, FDA Agree on Phase 3 Program to Evaluate Relapsing MS Therapy TG-1101 – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Newly approved MS drug changing treatment landscape – Fox News

Posted: August 2, 2017 at 10:45 pm

Believe it or not, until 1993 there was no treatment available for multiple sclerosis (MS), with doctors turning to steroids to manage patients symptoms. But over the past several years, there’s been an influx of new disease-modifying agents for MS, which affects more than two million people worldwide.

“When MS therapeutics were new, there was a tendency to start with lower potency medications and escalate to a higher potency agent only if the patient with MS continued to worsen, Dr. Ellen Lathi, director of the Elliot Lewish Center in Wellesley, Mass., told Fox News. Now most MS specialists believe that it is best to start more potent medication earlier in the disease in many patients to avoid future disability. We know that once disability occurs, we can do little about it; it is best to treat as aggressively as needed to avoid this disability.

Jud Ehrbar, of Manhattan, was diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS nearly 20 years ago. At the time, the now-47-year-old was a drummer in a band, and had started teaching math in public school. He eventually sacrificed both as his symptoms worsened over the years.

MICHIGAN BABY FACING LIFE-THREATENING DISEASE SIMILAR TO CHARLIE GARD’S DIAGNOSIS

“Eating was a huge problem, cutting food, tying shoes, putting on clothes, just anything that requires the littlest bit of dexterity in your fingers, Ehrbar told Fox News. I just couldn’t do it anymore.”

The father of two says his illness has been unpredictable, making it difficult to plan activities with his kids.

“It’s hard to think about my kids getting older and what Ill be doing with them and looking forward to different milestones when I don’t know how Im going to be doing at that point, even a year from now,” he said.

Ehrbar has tried many treatments including injections once per week, infusions once per month and recently pills, which he takes twice daily. They’re meant to keep him in remission, but he said he still has symptoms and now relies on a scooter to get around.

Mike Logan, a 48-year-old broadcaster and teacher in Boston, has a story similar to Ehrbars.

He was diagnosed in 1993 and struggles with mobility and balance, and also has bladder and bowel issues. He said his doctors believe he has the progressive form of MS, but he didnt need to take medications until 2015.

My condition had started to worsen over the last two years, and I was looking for anything that might slow the progression of the disease, Logan said.

He enrolled in a clinical trial for a now-FDA-approved drug called Ocrevus by Genentech, Inc. The drug is administered in a three-hour infusion just twice per year.

TEEN BATTLING BONE CANCER SWORN IN AS POLICE DETECTIVE

The drug works by attaching to a unique population of lymphocytes, and then depleting them from the body, Dr. Brian Apatoff, a neurologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York, told Fox News. In doing so, it keeps the cells out of circulation so that it doesnt activate immune responses in the nervous system.

Ocrevus is the first treatment approved for both forms of MS. In Logans portion of the trial, 488 patients were studied. It found patients were 24 percent less likely to have worsening symptoms compared to those who took a placebo.

This is significant because before this, there was no medication that had showed any benefit for people with primary progressive MS, Lathi said. The most common adverse reactions in the PPMS trial — incidence 10 percent — were upper respiratory tract infections, infusion reactions, skin infections, and lower respiratory tract infections.

Logan said he didnt have any side effects but also hasnt seen any improvements.

I still struggle walking on a daily basis and have started using a cane to help me get around, he said. I’m encouraged by the fact that Ocrevus may be able to slow down any further progression and maybe I will see some improvements in the near future.

Once the drug gained FDA approval in March 2017, Ehrbar also got the treatment with hopes of reducing frequency and severity of relapses.

“It’s given me some hope that I just never had before, Ehrbar said. Like I said, it was always about trying to prevent something from happening, having a better chance of maybe stopping something, whereas with this treatment, I feel like it’s probably going to stop things from getting worse completely.”

Apatoff said the results so far have been encouraging.

We were able to show that with this very infrequent administration, patients were able to achieve a level of remission that we didn’t see with the other active comparator in this study, he said.

Risks of the treatment include infection and development of certain types of cancer including breast cancer. It is not recommended for patients who have active hepatitis.

In choosing a medication for each patient, either at the time of diagnosis or at a later time in the disease, we must constantly balance the risk (safety) and benefit (efficacy) of each medication as it relates to the risk MS poses to an individual patient, Lathi said.

Read more:
Newly approved MS drug changing treatment landscape – Fox News

Posted in MS Treatment | Comments Off on Newly approved MS drug changing treatment landscape – Fox News

WH Defends Trump’s Remarks on How to Treat MS-13 Gang Members: He Was Joking – CNSNews.com

Posted: at 10:45 pm

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders (Screenshot of White House video)

(CNSNews.com) – President Donald Trump is taking heat for comments he made last week that some believe seemed to endorse police brutality against members of the MS-13 gang and criminal cartels.

During an event to highlight law enforcements efforts to combat the MS-13 gang in Long Island, N.Y., the president said Acting ICE Director Tom Homans guys are rough.

And I can tell you, I saw some photos where Toms guys — rough guys. They’re rough. I don’t want to be — say it because theyll say that’s not politically correct. You’re not allowed to have rough people doing this kind of work, Trump said.

Later in the speech, Trump said, Right now, we have less than 6,000 Enforcement and Removal Officers in ICE. This is not enough to protect a nation of more than 320 million people. It’s essential that Congress fund another 10,000 ICE officers — and we’re asking for that — so that we can eliminate MS-13 and root out the criminal cartels from our country.

He went on to say, Now, we’re getting them out anyway, but we’d like to get them out a lot faster, and when you see these towns and when you see these thugs being thrown into the back of a paddy wagon — you just see them thrown in, rough — I said, please dont be too nice.

Like when you guys put somebody in the car and you’re protecting their head, you know, the way you put their hand over? Like, dont hit their head and they’ve just killed somebody — don’t hit their head. I said, you can take the hand away, okay? the president said, while the audience applauded and laughed.

When asked about the presidents comments on Monday, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said the president was joking.

When the president made his speech to police officers on Friday, almost within minutes, statements came from police chiefs across the country criticizing his remarks that seemed to endorse the use of force by police in certain arrests. Was the president joking when he said this, or did he check his remarks out with the International Association of Police Chiefs or maybe the Attorney General? a reporter asked at Mondays White House press briefing.

I believe he was making a joke at the time, Sanders said.

Acting DEA Administrator Chuck Rosenberg sent an agency-wide email on Saturday, obtained by Politico, which clarified how the agency treats suspects.

The President, in remarks delivered yesterday in New York, condoned police misconduct regarding the treatment of individuals placed under arrest by law enforcement, Rosenberg wrote.

I write to offer a strong reaffirmation of the operating principles to which we, as law enforcement professionals, adhere. I write because we have an obligation to speak out when something is wrong. Thats what law enforcement officers do. Thats what you do. We fix stuff. At least, we try, Rosenberg added.

Rosenberg outlined the core valuesby whichhis agency operates.

This is how we conduct ourselves. This is how we treat those whom we encounter in our work: victims, witnesses, subjects, and defendants. This is who we are. I am incredibly grateful that you endeavor to live up to our Core Values, each day, he said.

It is not always easy, but it is always important. We must earn and keep the public trust and continue to hold ourselves to the very highest standards. Ours is an honorable profession and, so, we will always act honorably, Rosenberg concluded.

On Tuesday, reporters pressed the White House press secretary again about the presidents comments and her response that Trump was joking.

Yesterday, you said that the president was joking about his comments, putting suspects’ heads — telling police officers they shouldnt cover their heads in putting them in the car. Was he making a joke about police brutality?

Not at all. I think you guys are jumping and trying to make something out of nothing. He was simply making a comment, making a joke, and it was nothing more than that, Sanders said.

On that same issue, the head of the DEA wrote immediately after the president made those remarks — to officers of the DEA — telling them to disregard them, and saying he had an obligation to speak up when something wrong happened, a reporter at the briefing said.

It wasnt a directive, Sanders said about Trumps remarks. It was a joke. There’s a very big difference.

Read the rest here:
WH Defends Trump’s Remarks on How to Treat MS-13 Gang Members: He Was Joking – CNSNews.com

Posted in MS Treatment | Comments Off on WH Defends Trump’s Remarks on How to Treat MS-13 Gang Members: He Was Joking – CNSNews.com

Brain Stimulation Techniques Being Studied as Possible MS Treatments – Healthline

Posted: at 10:45 pm

Two different types of brain stimulation therapy are being tested to help relieve a number of MS-related symptoms such as leg spasticity and stress.

Different types of brain stimulation are being tested, and also used, for the treatment of many multiple sclerosis symptoms.

Two noninvasive brain stimulation procedures are showing potential and success in helping people with multiple sclerosis (MS) live better lives.

One type is called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), and the other is called Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS).

These two brain stimulation methods are different, yet both are finding their ways into MS research.

In TMS, a large machine is used to create a magnetic field that introduces electric current into of the brain. The procedure is performed in a clinic by a lab technician.

Between the two therapies, TMS is considered stronger and can make electrons fire. tDCS is not as strong and only encourages electrons to fire.

TMS has been tested on a variety of MS-related symptoms over the years.

These include fatigue, mood and attention, chronic pain, and oxidative stress. TMS is also used for moderating the blood brain barrier, which has also been found to be of clinical significance in the treatment of several autoimmune diseases.

TMS was also found to be helpful in both MS-related dexterity issues and dysphagia, which is the inability to think or say the proper word during a conversation, a common symptom of MS.

Now there are studies looking at TMS as an aid for spasticity in people with MS.

There is also a newer form of TMS, Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation (ITBS), that according to a small study, could be helpful in treating MS-related spasticity in the legs.

The other type of brain stimulation gaining traction in the MS arena is tDCS.

tDCS delivers electrical stimulation directly to the brain through electrodes placed on scalp, which target specific regions of the brain.

This procedure has been shown to successfully treat fatigue in adults with MS, as well as improve cognitive functioning in healthy controls and study participants with a range of medical disorders.

Cognitive impairment in MS remains a major treatment challenge, and researchers running a new trial out of New York University (NYU) Langone Medical Center are looking to see how treatment with tDCS could help.

Leigh Charvet, PhD, the studys principal investigator and an associate professor in the Department of Neurology at NYU, told Healthline that this study is putting MS at the forefront.

She noted that MS treatments are often a byproduct of research done on other illnesses. However, this study is centered on MS and helping as many patients as possible.

The goal of this study is to create a program that is accessible and sustainable for MS patients, meaning that it is easy to do and available in the comfort of ones own home.

She emphasized that more sessions seem to be leading to better results.

The tDCS device worked best when paired with cognitive training at home via telerehabilitation, Charvet explained.

Charvet also led a successful study published earlier this year about the positive results of telerehabilitation on cognitive issues. She said she was very excited about fatigue levels going down for patients as a result of her current trial, suggesting this could help many of those experiencing disabling MS-related fatigue.

But Charvet cautioned, Its still in an early stage with a lot to be learned.

Funded by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, the feasibility study was designed to reach as many people with MS in as many homes as possible with the purpose of using a brain stimulation device along with telemedicine to help them manage and improve symptoms such as fatigue and cognitive issues.

This feasibility study will test a sham device vs. the actual device. The clinical trial is currently seeking applicants.

In addition, data is still being collected for another clinical trial out of the University of Belgrade looking at rTMS for aiding lower limb spasticity in MS patients.

Other brain stimulation therapies similar to tDCS are also being evaluated.

Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS) differs in how the electrical current is delivered. It was cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2008 for depression and other conditions such as insomnia and anxiety.

These devices are available at clinics across the country. This process continues to show successful testing with the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Kelly Roman, co-founder of Fisher Wallace, a company that provides brain stimulation devices, told Healthline that of their 25,000 active customers, approximately 80 percent find success with their depression and 20 percent with insomnia issues.

While MS is not a focus for Fisher Wallace, the success of their products on MS-type symptoms could provide relief for some patients.

Editors Note: Caroline Craven is a patient expert living with MS. Her award winning blog is GirlwithMS.com, and she can be found @thegirlwithms.

See the rest here:
Brain Stimulation Techniques Being Studied as Possible MS Treatments – Healthline

Posted in MS Treatment | Comments Off on Brain Stimulation Techniques Being Studied as Possible MS Treatments – Healthline

MS Docs Tell How They Choose Treatments – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Posted: at 10:45 pm

What does your neurologist consider when he or she is deciding how best to treat your multiple sclerosis?

A recent report from Spherix Global Insights, a business intelligence and market research company that looks at drug trends every quarter, sheds some light on that. In my last column I wrote about what that research revealed about the latest trends in disease-modifying drugs (DMDs): which treatments are hot and which are not. This column focuses on what that report has to say about how and why neurologists decide on the treatments they choose.

Although the sample size is small, with only about 100 neurologists answering an online survey, it seems to do a good job of looking at this sort of thing.

The neurologists surveyed are split on their treatment priorities.

There was one goal that very few of the neurologists said they were interested in achieving. Only 2 percent thought it was important to stop the rate of their patients brain volume loss.

That last bullet point, taking insurance coverage into consideration, appears to be becoming a much more common practice.

A Spherix report from last April, DMT Switching in MS, says that in more than half the recent switches, patients have requested a specific DMD or DMDs, and that in 77percent of cases where a patient requested a specific DMD, the patient was put on that drug.

The new Spherix survey reveals that, compared to the same quarter last year, neurologists report drug insurance companies are exerting more pressure about which DMTs those doctors choose, and the insurance companies are becoming more aggressive in impacting the doctors overall MS patient management.

Many of the doctors in the survey are increasingly concerned that patients with high deductibles will self-restrict from needed care due to insurance restrictions. The survey also reports that the percentage of patients who doctors feel are receiving care thats less than the best, due to inadequate or inferior insurance, increased significantly over the past year, from 14 percent to 20 percent.

I regularly see reports on social media sites from patients whose insurers are telling them they cant be treated with a specific DMD until theyve tried one or two others. Usually its the newer drugs, such as Ocrevus or Lemtrada, that the insurance companies are reluctant to approve.

Here in the United States, where paying for medical care has become more of a political football than its ever been, I think we can expect more turmoil to surround medical costs and payments. Its incumbent upon each of us to stay on top of these issues and make our voices heard in the offices of our elected officials.

(Youre invited to follow my personal blog atwww.themswire.com)

***

Note:Multiple Sclerosis News Todayis strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those ofMultiple Sclerosis News Todayor its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.

Read this article:
MS Docs Tell How They Choose Treatments – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Posted in MS Treatment | Comments Off on MS Docs Tell How They Choose Treatments – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

MS News That Caught My Eye This Week: Myelin Repair, Ocrevus and Insurance, Cell Therapies – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Posted: at 10:45 pm

In case you missedthem, here are some news stories that appeared in MS News Today that caught my eye over the past week:

Those of us with MS know that if something can repair our myelin, the nerve insulator attacked by MS, theres a good chance some of our MS symptoms could be reversed. So this announcement, written by Magdalena Kegel, certainly lit my radar. Though this trial is limited to patients with a different disease, its certainly encouraging that this type of trial is moving ahead.

A cell therapy intended to boostmyelin regeneration Q-Cells byQ Therapeuticshas received agreen light from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to proceed with a clinical trial in patients with transverse myelitis (TM), a disease that, likemultiple sclerosis, is characterized by myelin damage.

FDA approval of the companys Investigational New Drug (IND) application allows researchers to start a Phase 1/2 clinical trial in whichnine patients will receive increasing doses of the treatment.

****

Neither of the statements in this headline should surprise someone who has MS, particularly if that person frequents MS web sites and Facebook pages. As Magdalena Kegel reports, Ocrevus has stirred up a ton of interest among patients and doctors since it was approved by the FDA less than six months ago. But getting insurance to pay for it, or for some other of the newer disease modifying drugs, can be easier said than done.

The market introduction ofOcrevus (ocrelizumabs)is off to a stellar start, with nearly half of neurologists surveyed by Spherix Global Insights saying they are using the therapy the first-ever approved for both relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS).

Within six months, 80 percent of neurologists are expected to prescribeOcrevus, according to a report in the second-quarter edition of RealTime Dynamix: Multiple Sclerosisby Spherix Global Insights.

But insurance is having an increasing impact on treatment decisions, the report also found.

****

This is a lengthy, all-encompassing article by Magdalena Kegel about the various forms of cell therapies that might one day be used by treat MS in the U.S. And one day is the key. The experts outline four kinds cell therapies, note their risks and obstacles, and build a case for why more clinical trials are needed. Agree with them or not, theres lots of good information here.

Clinical trials are the way to explore whether cell-based therapies are viable options for treating multiple sclerosis, a group of experts concluded in a publication exploring the state of research in the field.

The article, Cell-based therapeutic strategies for multiple sclerosis, was the result of discussions held at the International Conference on Cell-Based Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis in 2015. The experts reviewed evidence on a range of cell therapies, including stem cell transplants and delivery or stimulation of various cell types.

Clinical trials, the panel argued, would be the optimal way to examine which types of cells should be used, how they should be delivered, and the types and disease stages the treatments are suitable for.

***

Note: Multiple SclerosisNews Todayis strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those ofMultiple SclerosisNews Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to multiple sclerosis.

Read the original post:
MS News That Caught My Eye This Week: Myelin Repair, Ocrevus and Insurance, Cell Therapies – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Posted in MS Treatment | Comments Off on MS News That Caught My Eye This Week: Myelin Repair, Ocrevus and Insurance, Cell Therapies – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Risking her life to save it: Local woman tries stem cell transplant to … – WKYC-TV

Posted: July 8, 2017 at 6:52 am

Local woman trying experimental treatment to stop debilitating disease

Monica Robins, WKYC 12:11 AM. EDT July 06, 2017

(Photo: Submitted by Chelsea Jennings)

Chelsea Jennings uses yoga to stay centered. Its teaching keep her positive, which is important for for someone about to risk her live to save it.

She’s only 26 and facing a rapidly progressing debilitating disease that will likely put her in a wheelchair within a year.

As a new mom, she won’t accept that.

That’s why she’s risking her life for an experimental treatment that could possibly cure her disease.

Her motivation to try an experimental stem cell transplant to control her multiple sclerosis? Her 18-month-old son Camden and husband Jeff. “I understand that there is an extreme risk, but if the medication is not working for me I cannot just slowly deteriorate in front of my family, my son,” Chelsea says. “I cannot have that happen.”

Diagnosed five years ago, Chelsea tried every MS medication available, but couldn’t tolerate them. She researched alternatives and found Dr. Richard Burt at Northwestern University who performs hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for MS. Last month, she went in for testing and was approved.

Unfortunately it’s not covered by her insurance.

Undaunted, Chelsea held fundraisers to come up with the $125,000 dollar cost for a treatment with no guarantees. “Sometimes I do get scared and I do think, ‘Well. what if I go through this whole thing and it doesn’t work?’ but I feel like I have to, ” she explains. “I feel like I’m called to do this. This is my path, my journey.”

This Friday, she’ll receive chemotherapy to mobilize stem cells into her blood, then daily injections to boost the number. 10 days later, the cells will be collected and frozen. Chelsea will be able to come home for a couple of weeks before her next phase: more chemo to suppress her immune system and then receiving back her stem cells.

The hope is the new cells will regenerate the damage from MS.

But the treatment is not without consequences. There is a low chance of death from the procedure, plus she’ll be at higher risk from illness initially and likely go into early menopause.

While considered experimental, this treatment has been studied for more than a decade.

Research shows 83 percent of patients stay in remission for two years post-transplant.

2017 WKYC-TV

Here is the original post:
Risking her life to save it: Local woman tries stem cell transplant to … – WKYC-TV

Posted in MS Treatment | Comments Off on Risking her life to save it: Local woman tries stem cell transplant to … – WKYC-TV

MIS416 Fails to Benefit Secondary Progressive MS Patients in Phase 2 Clinical Trial – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Posted: at 6:52 am

Innate ImmunotherapeuticsMIS416has failed to helpsecondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) patients in a Phase 2 clinical trial.

The company said it will continue testing the therapy, made up of natural compounds, to see if it can benefit any MS subgroups.

Trial participants who received MIS416 had no meaningful improvements inneuromuscular function or the outcome of their disease, compared with those who took received a placebo.

It is disappointing that these results dont show benefit for people with secondary progressive MS, for whom there are few treatment options, Dr. Bruce Bebo, executive vice president of research at the National MS Society, said in a news release.

Scientists hoped the injected therapy would modulate the activity of immune cells that affect the protective myelin coating around nerve cells,decreasing the inflammation and brain tissue damage associated with MS. Deterioration of the coating is a hallmark of the disease.

The one-year trial (NCT02228213)tested the safety and effectiveness of MIS416 on 93 patients with SPMS in Australia and New Zealand. The patients randomly received MIS416 or a placebo once a week.

There were no differences in the groups scores on a disability index the expanded disability status scale or in brain volume changes detected by magnetic resonance imaging.

In addition, there were no differences between in disease outcomes that patients reported. The self-reported barometers included the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale, the Neurological Fatigue Index, and the Brief Pain Inventory.

I am extremely disappointed by this outcome, Professor Pam McCombe, a principal trial investigator, said in a companypress release. Looking for measurable changes in patients with progressive MS using the assessment tools currently at our disposal is frustrating and complicated. We were hopeful that MIS416 would be an option to treat this group of patients who currently do not have effective treatment options.

In addition to MIS416 failing to be effective, the group who received it had more treatment-related adverse events than the placebo group. The events were mainly related to the first dose, Innate said. The main problems were fever, chills, and muscle weakness.

The company has been providing MIS416 to Australian MS patients under a compassionate use program.

It said it will continue evaluating the safety and tolerability of the drug to see if it helps any subgroups of patients. Thosefindings will determine the future of the compassionate use program, it said.

These results are a shock, and definitely not what we were expecting based on our previous clinical experience with MIS416 and the reporting of treatment benefits we have received from many compassionate use patients over an extensive eight-year period, saidSimon Wilkinson, Innate Immunotherapeutics chief executive officer.These data will be as distressing to them as they will be for all the stakeholders who were relying on the outcome of this study.

Read more:
MIS416 Fails to Benefit Secondary Progressive MS Patients in Phase 2 Clinical Trial – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Posted in MS Treatment | Comments Off on MIS416 Fails to Benefit Secondary Progressive MS Patients in Phase 2 Clinical Trial – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Page 11234..1020..»