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Category Archives: MS Treatment

Neuroprotection: A Possible Future Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Posted: June 23, 2017 at 5:47 am

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Neuroprotection: A Possible Future Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

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EXCLUSIVE: Experts, patients call for more treatment options for progressive MS – Globalnews.ca

Posted: at 5:47 am

One week after a Montreal man went public, urging Health Canada to approve a new drug for multiple sclerosis, more patients and physicians are now coming forward and calling for more treatment options. The new drug in question may not be the ideal therapy for all forms of MS, but it offers hope to patients who until now have had few treatment options.

Primary and secondary progressive multiple sclerosis are the most debilitating forms of MS for patients and the hardest to treat for physicians.

The progressive MS element is the one that is still the most resistant, Montreal Neurological Institute researcher and McGill University professor of neurology Dr. Jack Antel said. We have to gain more in understanding how the brain works not only the immune system so we can deal with this very serious disorder.

READ MORE:Montrealer with MS calling on Health Canada to approve breakthrough drug Ocrevus

A Montreal man spoke out last week about his fight to bring a new FDA-approved drug called Ocrelizumab (Ocrevus) to Canada. Its been available to patients in the U.S. since March. But it could take months before its available to Canadian patients. According to Health Canada the drug is subject to a 300-day scientific review period which started in October 2016.

You know if this drug can halt the progress of MS its a good thing isnt it, for me it is anyway, 64-year-old Joe Petrilli told Global News last week.

Another patient with primary progressive MS in the Maritimes is relieved to hear treatment may soon be an option. Hes been dealing with symptoms of progressive MS for 27 years.

Its gotten to the point where I cant walk, Jack MacDuff from Moncton, New Brunswick said. I dont expect its going to help me a lot but I think we have to keep working to help the younger generation.

MacDuff was once an accomplished athlete, bringing home the countrys top curling trophy, the Brier Cup in 1976. Ever since his diagnosis, hes helped raise tens of thousands of dollars for the MS Society in the hopes research will help give future MS patients better outcomes.

Its something we should really work on and try to encourage a cure for the next generation MacDuff said.

The MS society of Canada spends up to $10 million a year on research in the hopes of finding new treatment and ultimately a cure.

Great results have been coming from the research we have funded from stem cell research that we have funded, positive clinical trials in that area as well as recently positive clinical trial results in an antibiotic for the first event in MS, MS Society of Canada vice-president research Dr. Karen Lee said.

READ MORE:Calgary clinic uses new technology to help people with spinal cord injuries, MS

Many researchers and neurologists wish Health Canada had fast-tracked the approval process, despite the medications high cost and despite the fact that it may not be the ideal drug for progressive forms of MS.

Im more concerned with the risk and toxicity of the drug rather than the cost of the drug for our patients, Antel said.

Ocrevus is administered as a slow-drip intravenous injection and removes a key component of the immune system putting some patients at greater risk of infections or even cancer.

Still its enough to give some hope to patients who until now have had none.

The MS community around the world has done their job and now theyre giving it to the world saying OK approve it! said Petrilli.

2017Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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EXCLUSIVE: Experts, patients call for more treatment options for progressive MS – Globalnews.ca

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MS Researcher Stephen Hauser, MD, Awarded the 2017 Taubman Prize – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Posted: at 5:47 am

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MS Researcher Stephen Hauser, MD, Awarded the 2017 Taubman Prize – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

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Health Check: New drug used to treat multiple sclerosis – Turn to 10

Posted: June 17, 2017 at 10:42 am

by BARBARA MORSE SILVA, NBC 10 NEWS

A new breakthrough drug called Ocrevus is being used to treat multiple sclerosis.

A new breakthrough drug called Ocrevus is being used to treat multiple sclerosis.

“I started noticing things were getting blurry,” said 47-year-old Preston Corbin, who went to see his eye doctor. “He saw something that wasn’t right and sent me to Rhode Island Hospital.”

It was at Rhode Island Hospital, just one month shy of his 40th birthday, that Corbin was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

“His type of MS is what we call relapsing and remitting,” said Dr. Syed Rizvi, a neurologist and director of the M.S. Center at Rhode Island Hospital.

Relapsing and remitting means his symptoms would come and go. Then he started progressing.

“It has worsened, said Corbin. I mean, I’m not in a wheelchair so that’s good, but I definitely notice. I don’t run anymore.”

But then a few months ago, in March, Ocrevus was FDA-approved.

“It looks extremely promising. It is an infusion or a cycle of infusions two weeks a part, every six months,” said Rizvi.

Corbin was the first in Rhode Island to be infused with this antibody that targets a cell that causes the inflammation in MS patients.

“I believe what you want is to prevent further worsening and further relapses and further new lesions and you just want to keep them stable, said Rizvi. And, an added benefit may be that there’s some improvement.”

“I have not noticed improvement but I have not noticed worsening.”

That’s a good thing, according to Rizvi. And that doesnt mean that he wont see improvement in the future.

Who’s a good candidate for this infusion?

“This drug, in trials, was tested in patients very early, soon after diagnosis, as well as patients who had been on other treatments as well,” said Rizvi.

So it could potentially benefit a wide variety of MS patients. Rizvi says the sooner this drug is used, the better.

What are some of the early symptoms of this disease?

“Loss of vision or double-vision or numbness, tingling and gait problems or any kind of neurological problems, I think it’s important to consider the possibility of seeking medical treatment,” Rizvi said.

The treatment is $65,000 a year.

Corbin is one of only a handful of MS patients to receive this treatment at Rhode Island Hospital, but Rizvi said about 70 of his patients are good candidates. He said theyre having trouble getting insurance to cover it, especially as a first line treatment.

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Health Check: New drug used to treat multiple sclerosis – Turn to 10

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Bioengineers develop new technologies to drive next-generation … – Medical Xpress

Posted: June 14, 2017 at 9:46 am

June 13, 2017 Demyelination by MS. The CD68 colored tissue shows several macrophages in the area of the lesion. Original scale 1:100. Credit: Marvin 101/Wikipedia

Researchers in the University of Maryland (UMD) Fischell Department of Bioengineering (BIOE) Jewell Laboratory are using quantum dots – tiny semiconductor particles commonly used in nanotechnology – to decipher the features needed to design specific and effective therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases. Their findings were published this week as the cover story of Advanced Functional Materials.

“Engineering technologies aimed at autoimmune disease could pave the way for new treatment options,” said principal investigator and BIOE assistant professor Christopher Jewell. “However, in order to develop next-generation therapies, bioengineers need basic insight into the specific features that are critical to therapy design. Generally, because the human body is so complex, discoveries in medicine have relied on trial-and-error. But, by using rational design approaches – understanding what each piece of a potential therapeutic controls – we have the potential to transform how disease is tackled. Toward this goal, our team used quantum dots to dissect some of the important design features for new nanotherapeutics aimed at MS.”

In MS, the immune system incorrectly recognizes components of the central nervous system, causing inflammation and destruction of myelin, the fatty substance that surrounds and protects nerve fibers. When this happens, nerve fibers and cells are damaged, leading to loss of motor function and other complications. The National Multiple Sclerosis Society estimates that MS affects more than 2.3 million people worldwide.

“Symptoms can vary greatly from patient to patient, but can produce extreme fatigue, muscle weakness, and spasticity, and significant pain, “said Krystina Hess, BIOE graduate student and lead author of the Advanced Functional Materials paper. “There is currently no cure for MS, and traditional therapies broadly decrease the activity of the immune system at a cost that leaves MS patients vulnerable to infection.”

One promising strategy to overcome these hurdles is generation of what are known as regulatory T cells (TREGS), the type of white blood cells responsible for turning off immune responses in the body. These cells are capable of restraining the inflammatory response against myelin that occurs in MS, while keeping healthy functions of the immune system intact.

In the human body, the immune system uses antigens – molecules that are present on all cells and vary according to the type of cell – to distinguish self-cells from foreign cells. Because the immune system recognizes specific types of antigens as those displayed by human cells, it can quickly activate an immune response once it detects foreign substance, such as bacteria, toxins, or a virus.

Recent studies focused on specific MS treatments have revealed that the development of inflammation or tolerance against self-molecules is influenced by the concentration and form of antigens reaching the tissues that coordinate immune function – namely, lymph nodes and the spleen. Even more, new studies reveal that changing the way myelin is processed and presented to the immune system can drive tolerance instead of inflammation.

Knowing this, Jewell teamed up with Dr. Igor Medintz and his colleagues at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory to develop a precision system that uses quantum dots to control how many self-antigens are displayed on each dot. One reason Jewell and his team looked to quantum dots is because they are uniform and very small, allowing efficient draining through lymphatic vessels and accumulation in the lymph nodes.

Quantum dots are also fluorescent, which allows real-time tracking in cells and animals. The team hypothesized that, by using quantum dots displaying defined densities of myelin peptides, they could reveal how the number or density of peptides alters the processing and trafficking of the peptide and, in turn, promotes TREGS that control the disease.

“One of our exciting findings is that tolerance and elimination of paralysis in a pre-clinical mouse model was much better when myelin peptides were displayed on many quantum dots at a low density of 25 per dot, instead of fewer quantum dots displaying the same number of peptides but at a high density of 65 per dot,” Jewell said. “Developing specific knowledge or design guidelines such as these might enable more selective – and effective – therapies to treat MS and other diseases.”

Explore further: Altering the immune system to reverse paralysis

More information: Krystina L. Hess et al, Immunotherapy: Engineering Immunological Tolerance Using Quantum Dots to Tune the Density of Self-Antigen Display (Adv. Funct. Mater. 22/2017), Advanced Functional Materials (2017). DOI: 10.1002/adfm.201770132

In the ultimate betrayal, one’s own immune system can turn against the protective sheath that envelops neurons in the brain, leaving the body paralyzed. Researchers have developed an experimental treatment that tames the …

Researchers from the University of Maryland Fischell Department of Bioengineering and the University of Maryland School of Medicine report a new way to “turn off” the harmful immune attack that occurs during autoimmune diseases …

Using red blood cells modified to carry disease-specific antigens, scientists in the laboratories of Hidde Ploegh (former Whitehead Member, currently Boston Children’s Hospital) and Harvey Lodish (Whitehead Founding Member) …

Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system attacks the patient’s own cells. In this case, modified T cells destroy the myelin sheath surrounding nerve cells. Myelin protects the neural pathways …

A team of researchers, led by investigators at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, have identified a new class of antigens that may be a contributing factor to type 1 diabetes, according to an article published …

In research published in the prestigious journal Immunity, a Saint Louis University researcher reports new findings that help understand how the immune system’s dendritic cells direct other immune cells called T lymphocytes …

Researchers in the University of Maryland (UMD) Fischell Department of Bioengineering (BIOE) Jewell Laboratory are using quantum dots – tiny semiconductor particles commonly used in nanotechnology – to decipher the features …

Researchers at UC Berkeley have found unexpected effects of viral infections, a discovery that may explain why viruses can make people feel so lousy.

In news that may bring hope to asthma sufferers, scientists discover a mechanism that provides a possible new target for allergy treatments.

(HealthDay)Administration of allergen immunotherapy (AIT) in patients with allergic asthma leads to lower short-term symptom and medication scores, according to a review published online May 19 in Allergy.

A single treatment giving life-long protection from severe allergies such as asthma could be made possible by immunology research at The University of Queensland.

Malaria caused by Plasmodium parasites is a life-threatening infectious disease that kills at least half a million people annually while causing over 200 million new infections. In some cases, complications can quickly develop …

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Bioengineers develop new technologies to drive next-generation … – Medical Xpress

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Why Lemtrada for MS May Lead to Other Diseases Appears to … – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Posted: at 9:46 am

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Why Lemtrada for MS May Lead to Other Diseases Appears to … – Multiple Sclerosis News Today

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Stem Cell Therapy Offers Hope for Multiple Sclerosis Remission – Healthline

Posted: at 9:46 am

By combining an experimental stem cell treatment with a nanoparticle delivery system, researchers may eventually stop MS and other autoimmune diseases.

An innovative stem cell therapy could change how we treat multiple sclerosis (MS), but are we any closer to a cure?

The work of Dr. Su Metcalfe, founder and chief scientific officer of the biotech company LIFNano, appears to be breathing new life into that hope.

Metcalfe and her team developed a way to fight MS by using the bodys own natural mechanisms but it hasnt been tested in humans yet.

MS is an inflammatory and neurodegenerative autoimmune disease that can result in an array of neurological symptoms including fatigue, muscle spasms, speech problems, and numbness. It is caused by the immune system attacking myelin, the insulating coating that runs along the outside of nerve cells. The result is damage to the brain and central nervous system.

The disease currently affects roughly 2.5 million people worldwide. About 200 new cases are diagnosed each week in the United States.

LIFNano uses a new treatment based on LIF a stem cell protein that forms naturally in the body to signal and regulate the immune systems response to myelin.

LIF, in addition to regulating and protecting us against attack, also plays a major role in keeping the brain and spinal cord healthy, Metcalfe recently told Cambridge News.

In fact it plays a major role in tissue repair generally, turning on stem cells that are naturally occurring in the body, making it a natural regenerative medicine, but also plays a big part in repairing the brain when its been damaged, she said.

Metcalfe has spent years studying LIF, but only recently realized its potential for treatment likening it to an on/off switch for the immune system.

However, once she discovered its potential, there were almost immediate problems in its application. One of the earliest was how quickly LIF breaks down once it is administered into the body.

If you try just to inject it into a patient, it dissipates or disappears in about 20 minutes, Olivier Jarry, CEO of LIFNano, told Healthline.

That makes it unusable in a clinic. You would have to have some kind of pump and inject it continually.

A breakthrough came for Metcalfe when she took findings from her studies of LIF and applied them to nanotechnology. The treatment she is now developing relies on nanospheres derived from a well-established medical polymer known as PLGA, which is already used in materials like stitches. And because it is biodegradable, it can be left to dissolve inside the body.

Storing LIF inside these PLGA nanospheres before administering them into the bloodstream allows for a sustained dose over the course of several days.

The process differs significantly from the current drugs used to treat MS. These treatments most often fall under the category of drugs known as immunosuppressors, which inhibit the bodys overall immune system response.

LIF is theoretically much more precise than immunosuppressors, and should keep the immune system functioning against harmful infections and disease.

Were not using any drugs, said Metcalfe. Were simply switching on the bodys own systems of self-tolerance and repair. There arent any side effects because all were doing is tipping the balance. Autoimmunity happens when that balance has gone awry slightly, and we simply reset that.

The team cautions that LIF therapy is still several years away.

While some outlets have run wild with Metcalfes research, announcing that a cure for MS is right around the corner, those headlines are speculative.

Some MS advocacy groups have even made public statements calling coverage of her work premature and irresponsible.

Jarry told Healthline that LIFNano is expecting to enter FDA phase I trials in 2020. This would be the first time that it is used in human subjects. But even if the treatment proves to be safe and effective, the soonest it could be on the market is 2023, he estimated.

The main focus of LIF therapy is now on MS. But it has potential for treating other autoimmune diseases including psoriasis and lupus.

We are optimistic in the sense that we may provide a long-term remission for patients with MS, said Jarry.

Is it a cure? Wed love at some point to use the term cure, but we are very cautious.

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Electrical Stimulation May Help MS Patients Who Can’t Walk – Healthline

Posted: June 11, 2017 at 6:41 am

Researchers are working on devices and new technology that could help people with multiple sclerosis walk again.

A treatment option that seemed to give false hope 30 years ago is now showing potential for people with multiple sclerosis (MS) who can no longer walk.

When the movie First Stepscame out in 1985 medical experts scoffed at its message that electrical stimulation was a viable option for helping people to walk again after traumatic spinal cord injuries.

Today experts are successfully providing functional electrical stimulation for spinal cord patients.

And just recently extended its use to the world of MS.

Read more: The benefits of yoga for people with MS

Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is a treatment that uses small electrical charges to improve mobility for someone who has difficulties with walking caused by damage to the brain or spinal cord.

FES stimulates the nerves in the leg, causing the muscles to contract and produce a movement that can aid in walking. Currently with MS, the most common use of FES is as a treatment for foot drop.

Dr. Stephen Selkirk, a neurologist at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, told Healthline that FES may not work for everyone.

He said in order for FES to work it is important that nerve fibers between the spinal cord and the muscles are not damaged.

There are cases where the damage is too extensive for treatment to work. While this is true in traumatic spinal cord injuries, it may not be an issue for people with MS.

Read more: Magnet therapy as MS treatment

After seeing success with FES for people with traumatic spinal cord injuries, Selkirk suggested using it for people with MS.

So, in partnership with the Advanced Platform Technology (APT) Center, a new device was created specifically for these people.

This new device is the size of a hockey puck and is inserted into the abdomen cavity, similar to baclofen pumps used to treat muscle spasticity in people with MS.

Selkirk specializes in spinal cord injuries and works with people who have MS and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) who can no longer walk.

In his work at Veterans Affairs (VA), Selkirk sees some 300 people with MS, 100 of whom can no longer walk.

There has been a long battle to find funding, said Selkirk, adding that different grant applications were submitted 11 times but never approved.

But then APT approved it and found success, yet there is concern about the market size of people with MS who could benefit from these devices.

Approximately 2.5 million people worldwide have MS, and of those some 30 percent have difficulties with walking and can end up using a wheelchair.

Read more: Multiple sclerosis and biotin treatment

Currently, there are several FES devices available to people with MS, according to the National Multiple Sclerosis Society website.

At a price tag of around $5,000, the WalkAide from Innovative Neurotronics, the NESS L300 from Bioness, and the Odstock Dropped Foot Stimulator from Odstock Medical Limited in the United Kingdom, are available over the counter.

These devices only work with the ankle and knee and not the entire leg, which make them good for foot drop, but not as successful for those needing more help walking.

Doctors also prescribe Ampyra, a prescription drug designed to help with walking, but it is only effective in about 30 percent of those whove taken it.

The new, implanted FES works by bypassing the demyelinated axons and allowing the box to communicate directly with the nerves, telling them to send a signal to a muscle.

Electrodes are implanted under the skin at the sites of the affected muscles and can easily be adjusted according to progression.

However, the peer reviews dont see it this way. They see a fixed system, making it difficult to get funding for further studies.

Selkirk debunked a couple of other concerns.

It is generally OK for people with MS to undergo the surgery necessary for the implantation, he said.

The other concern is in MRI compatibility. Earlier devices did not work with this technology, but a new MRI compatible device is currently being tested.

Read more: Vitamin D may help prevent, treat MS

The next step is to prove MRI compatibility in the next iteration of the device, then implant it in the next group of people.

Selkirk has plenty of volunteers people with MS willing to try just about anything to find an improved quality of life.

While the device being tested right now requires someone to turn it on and control it, the goal is to have the brain communicate this information to the device directly.

Selkirk is currently working with Braingate to create a brain-computer interface.

This is the future. An implanted system where you bypass the broken part with technology that is integrated, and all you need to do is think move my left leg and it will happen, he said.

Key thing to consider is perspective. Selkirk said. In the private sector doctors see various levels of MS. I only see advanced MS patients.

He knows what is important to people with MS, such as quality of life.

Even just the ability to stand up, to transfer to the commode or wheelchair is improvement in quality of life.

To be independent and spontaneous along with the physical benefits such as alleviating pressure wounds and sores could benefit many.

Editors Note: Caroline Craven is a patient expert living with MS. Her award winning blog isGirlwithMS.com, and she can be found @thegirlwithms.

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Dad overwhelmed after 60k raised for MS treatment that could give him the extra time he craves to watch his … – Belfast Telegraph

Posted: June 10, 2017 at 1:42 am

Dad overwhelmed after 60k raised for MS treatment that could give him the extra time he craves to watch his children grow up

BelfastTelegraph.co.uk

A father-of-five who is fighting multiple sclerosis has raised more than 60,000 to fund treatment in Mexico.

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/dad-overwhelmed-after-60k-raised-for-ms-treatment-that-could-give-him-the-extra-time-he-craves-to-watch-his-children-grow-up-35804345.html

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/article35804342.ece/afd8d/AUTOCROP/h342/2017-06-09_new_31865895_I1.JPG

A father-of-five who is fighting multiple sclerosis has raised more than 60,000 to fund treatment in Mexico.

John McNaughton, who was diagnosed in 2011, hopes that the intervention will give him precious years to watch his children grow up.

After failed therapy attempts here in the UK, the 43-year-old from Glenariff in the Glens of Antrim, came across positive onlinew reviews of a private treatment in Mexico.

But he had to raise the cash before his condition got so bad that doctors would not offer him the treatment.

Initially booking to travel in mid-September, John and wife Patricia raised a massive 34,000 from fundraisers held in his local hurling club and from various donations, but needed the remaining balance by July.

This prompted John to start a crowdfunding page in April, which helped him to meet the balance after an amazing response from supporters.

John said: “The community response has been overwhelming, I thought it would be hard raising the money in three or four months, but achieving it in four or five weeks is unbelievable.”

Following this success, John has been able to move the date of his treatment forward, and will be leaving for America on June 19.

The treatment, known as Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT), is offered by the Clinigue Riuz Group in Mexico.

The aim is to halt the progression of the disease, by stopping the immune system from attacking the central nervous system.

With the use of chemotherapy, harmful immune cells are removed from the body, ‘cleaned’ and then reinserted to help the immune system ‘reset’ itself.

The therapy lasts for 28 days, with approximately one year recovery time, and there is still no guarantee that it will work.

John said: “It is a relatively new study, but works for over 80% of people. One person had the therapy eight years ago and is still benefiting from it”.

Previously, John said: “There are things I’d like to be doing with the children but I can’t any more.

“It’s the simple things. A simple job is now a massive job.”

He worked as a farmer before he became ill and as his condition deteriorated, he had to assume an ‘overseeing’ role on the family farm.

John’s eldest child, 13-year-old Shea, now takes care of the hands-on maintenance, assisted by his younger siblings Clodagh (11), Eoin (8) and Ruairi (6).

John has been so ill that he has only been able to carry his youngest daughter Shannon, who is three, once since birth.

Commenting on his hopes for the future, he said that “it would be fantastic to walk again, but the aim is to slow the progression, anything else would be a bonus”.

Belfast Telegraph

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Patients volunteer for pioneering treatment by Cambridge scientist on verge of curing multiple sclerosis – Cambridge News

Posted: at 1:42 am

Scores of people living with multiple sclerosis have put themselves forward for clinical trials as part of a Cambridge scientists bid to develop a treatment to cure the disease.

MS, an auto-immune condition which affects 2.3 million people around the world, attacks cells in the brain and the spinal cord, causing an array of physical and mental side effects including blindness and muscle weakness.

At the moment theres no cure, but Cambridge scientist Su Metcalfe and her company, LIFNano, hope to change that.

On Sunday the News told how Su has married one of the bodys cleverest functions with some cutting-edge technology. The natural side of the equation is provided by a stem cell particle called a LIF.

Su said: I discovered a small binary switch, controlled by a LIF, which regulates inside the immune cell itself. LIF is able to control the cell to ensure it doesnt attack your own body but then releases the attack when needed.

That LIF, in addition to regulating and protecting us against attack, also plays a major role in keeping the brain and spinal cord healthy. In fact it plays a major role in tissue repair generally, turning on stem cells that are naturally occurring in the body, making it a natural regenerative medicine, but also plays a big part in repairing the brain when its been damaged.

So I thought, this is fantastic. We can treat auto-immune disease, and weve got something to treat MS, which attacks both the brain and the spinal cord. So you have a double whammy that can stop and reverse the auto-immunity, and also repair the damage caused in the brain.

Sus company LIFNano has already attracted two major funding awards, from drug firm Merck and the Governments Innovate UK agency.

The company hopes to attract more investment, with the aim of starting clinical trials in 2020.

Off the back of the article regarding Sus work, people commented in their droves offering to trial Dr Metcalfes treatment, which is being touted as a possible cure.

Many also shared their experiences of living with MS.

James Stokes, 52 from Reading, was just one of many to comment on our story.

He told the News : I was diagnosed with MS on my 18th birthday of all days, but I wasnt told then that it was MS.

I had a big attack and was put in hospital; I lost my sight and couldnt speak or walk.

Even then I still wasnt officially told it was MS until a few years later.

About 10 years ago, things started to go downhill and I found myself basically housebound; I can still walk but not a great distance.

I use a walking stick, and have to use a wheelchair if Im going long distances.

MS has robbed me of my life, but when I saw this article there was a glimmer of hope.

Id love to know more about it [the process] and would be willing to take part in clinical trials.

If they could reverse my MS that would mean everything. At the moment, I feel as if Ive been given a life sentence but with no parole.

If a cure for MS is found, I could get a new lease of life and a lot more hope.

Many others also commented on the story regarding Sus work.

Debbie Brown wrote: This gives me some hope that things will improve in my lifetime. Diagnosed with RRMS in 2000. Very interested in registering for a clinical trial.

Amy Keighley said: My father was diagnosed with MS in 1996. He has been on several medications and is currently being treated by Dr Tornatori at Georgetown University Medical Center.

He fights every day and lives life to the fullest. He and my mother have been together since 1950. They were 15 years old. They are both retired from operating a jewellery store together for 23 years.

They try to travel every month and my dad’s spirits remain high. I would like to ask that my dad be considered for the clinical trial.

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