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Category Archives: Ventricular Remodeling

Ventricular Remodeling Procedure | Main Line Health …

Posted: February 24, 2019 at 3:46 am

A ventricular remodeling procedure, which involves reshaping of an abnormal heart muscle, is often performed along with coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or mitral valve repair or replacement. Conditions that my require ventricular remodeling including cardiomyopathy, aortic disease, heart attack and heart failure. People who have had a heart attack, for example, may develop scar tissue that causes the hearts left ventricle to become enlarged and weak. Continue reading

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TIMI Study Group – LEADERSHIP

Posted: January 31, 2019 at 9:48 am

LEADERSHIP Marc S. Sabatine, MD, MPHis Chairman of the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) Study Group, the Lewis Dexter, MD, Distinguished Chair in Cardiovascular Medicine at Brigham and Womens Hospital (BWH), and a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS). Dr. Continue reading

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Ventricular dysfunction in heart failure – Britannica.com

Posted: December 25, 2018 at 12:41 am

Ventricular dysfunction in heart failure The major role of the ventricles in pumping blood to the lungs and body means that even a slight decrease in ventricular efficiency can have a significant impact on heart function. If the left ventricle encounters either absolute or relative functional insufficiency (called left ventricular heart failure, or left-sided heart failure), a series of compensatory reactions are initiated that may temporarily provide a return to sufficient ventricular function. Continue reading

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Left Ventricular Remodeling in Heart Failure | JACC …

Posted: November 25, 2018 at 1:46 pm

Ventricular remodeling, first described in animal models of left ventricular (LV) stress and injury, occurs progressively in untreated patients after large myocardial infarction and in those with dilated forms of cardiomyopathy. The gross pathologic changes of increased LV volume and perturbation in the normal elliptical LV chamber configuration is driven, on a histologic level, by myocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis and by increased interstitial collagen. Each of the techniques used for tracking this processechocardiography, radionuclide ventriculography, and cardiac magnetic resonancecarries advantages and disadvantages. Numerous investigations have demonstrated the value of LV volume measurement at a single time-point and over time in predicting clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure and in those after myocardial infarction. The structural pattern of LV remodeling and evidence of scarring on cardiac magnetic resonance have additional prognostic value. Beyond the impact of abnormal cardiac structure on cardiovascular events, the relationship between LV remodeling and clinical outcomes is likely linked through common local and systemic factors driving vascular as well as myocardial pathology. As demonstrated by a recent meta-analysis of heart failure trials, LV volume stands out among surrogate markers as strongly correlating with the impact of a particular drug or device therapy on patient survival. These … Continue reading

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Ventricular Remodeling Surgery (SVR)

Posted: September 24, 2018 at 5:45 am

Surgical Ventricular Reconstruction (SVR) Surgical ventricular reconstruction (SVR) reduces the size of a patient's failing, enlarged heart to ensure that blood is pumped out of the heart, and through the body efficiently enough to allow them to participate in a full, active life. In a healthy patient, oxygen-rich blood returning from the lungs is pumped through the heart and to the body. In 25 percent of heart attack patients, the left ventricle dilates from its natural football shape into a rounder, basketball shape. This new shape interferes with the heart's ability to contract strongly enough to push the returning blood through the heart. Instead, blood pools in the lungs causing a variety of symptoms that typically compromise quality of life: During the SVR procedure, the cardiothoracic surgeon will reshape the patient's heart so that it can contract more effectively and restore a free flow of oxygen-rich blood throughout the body. Following the procedure, patients who were once winded by their favorite activities, from gardening to golf, can return to these activities free from chest pain and shortness of breath. Montefiore Einstein Center for Heart and Vascular Care is a national leader in surgical ventricular reconstruction. SVR has a greater than … Continue reading

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Left ventricular hypertrophy – Wikipedia

Posted: August 20, 2018 at 12:43 pm

Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is thickening of the heart muscle of the left ventricle of the heart, that is, left-sided ventricular hypertrophy. While ventricular hypertrophy occurs naturally as a reaction to aerobic exercise and strength training, it is most frequently referred to as a pathological reaction to cardiovascular disease, or high blood pressure.[1] It is one aspect of ventricular remodeling. While LVH itself is not a disease, it is usually a marker for disease involving the heart.[2] Disease processes that can cause LVH include any disease that increases the afterload that the heart has to contract against, and some primary diseases of the muscle of the heart. Causes of increased afterload that can cause LVH include aortic stenosis, aortic insufficiency and hypertension. Primary disease of the muscle of the heart that cause LVH are known as hypertrophic cardiomyopathies, which can lead into heart failure. Long-standing mitral insufficiency also leads to LVH as a compensatory mechanism. Associated genes include OGN, osteoglycin.[3] The principal method to diagnose LVH is echocardiography, with which the thickness of the muscle of the heart can be measured. The electrocardiogram (ECG) often shows signs of increased voltage from the heart in individuals with LVH, so this is … Continue reading

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Ventricular Remodeling | Profiles RNS

Posted: July 24, 2018 at 11:45 pm

"Ventricular Remodeling" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings). Descriptors are arranged in a hierarchical structure, which enables searching at various levels of specificity. The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle. C23.300.985 G09.330.190.962.975 Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is more general than "Ventricular Remodeling". Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is more specific than "Ventricular Remodeling". This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Ventricular Remodeling" by people in this website by year, and whether "Ventricular Remodeling" was a major or minor topic of these publications. Below are the most recent publications written about "Ventricular Remodeling" by people in Profiles. Wenk JF, Klepach D, Lee LC, Zhang Z, Ge L, Tseng EE, Martin A, Kozerke S, Gorman JH, Gorman RC, Guccione JM. First evidence of depressed contractility in the border zone of a human myocardial infarction. Ann Thorac Surg. 2012 Apr; 93(4):1188-93. Xu EZ, Kantores C, Ivanovska J, Engelberts D, Kavanagh BP, McNamara … Continue reading

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Acute Management of Pulmonary Embolism – American College …

Posted: July 17, 2018 at 2:45 am

Introduction Venous thromboembolic disease (VTE) is estimated to occur in at least 1 to 2 persons per 1000 population annually, manifesting as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE) or in combination.1-3 It is the cause of over 100,000 deaths annually and is the most preventable cause of death in hospitalized patients in the United States.4 Despite treatment with anticoagulant therapy, a significant proportion of survivors of acute DVT or PE are at risk of suffering from the disabling sequelae such as the post thrombotic syndrome (PTS), recurrent VTE or chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH).1,5 Given the limitations of medical therapy, promising endovascular treatment modalities have evolved over the past two decades in an effort to mitigate the acute and chronic disability from VTE.6,7 The purpose of this review is to discuss the rationale and evidence for an endovascular treatment approach for high-risk acute DVT and PE patients. The Rationale for an Interventional Approach to Massive and Submassive PE The most dreaded acute complication of PE is death; it is estimated that over 100,000 deaths in hospitalized patients in the United States are attributable to acute PE each year.4 The severity of PE is stratified into massive (PE causing hemodynamic … Continue reading

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Heart Failure Medication: Beta-Blockers, Alpha Activity …

Posted: July 7, 2018 at 10:42 am

Ho KK, Pinsky JL, Kannel WB, Levy D. The epidemiology of heart failure: the Framingham Study. J Am Coll Cardiol. 1993 Oct. 22 (4 suppl A):6A-13A. [Medline]. [Full Text]. American Heart Association. Classes of heart failure. Available at http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HeartFailure/AboutHeartFailure/Classes-of-Heart-Failure_UCM_306328_Article.jsp#.WUcGf-vyuHs. Updated: May 8, 2017; Accessed: June 18, 2017. [Guideline] Yancy CW, Jessup M, Bozkurt B, et al, American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. 2013 ACCF/AHA guideline for the management of heart failure: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. Circulation. 2013 Oct 15. 128(16):e240-327. [Medline]. [Full Text]. [Guideline] Ponikowski P, Voors AA, Anker SD, et al, for the Authors/Task Force Members. 2016 ESC guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure: The task force for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Developed with the special contribution of the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the ESC. Eur Heart J. 2016 Jul 14. 37 (27):2129-200. [Medline]. [Full Text]. [Guideline] Lindenfeld J, Albert NM, Boehmer JP, et al, for the Heart Failure Society of America. HFSA 2010 comprehensive heart failure practice guideline. J Card … Continue reading

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Ventricular septal defect – Wikipedia

Posted: June 21, 2018 at 12:47 am

A ventricular septal defect (VSD) is a defect in the ventricular septum, the wall dividing the left and right ventricles of the heart. The extent of the opening may vary from pin size to complete absence of the ventricular septum, creating one common ventricle. The ventricular septum consists of an inferior muscular and superior membranous portion and is extensively innervated with conducting cardiomyocytes. The membranous portion, which is close to the atrioventricular node, is most commonly affected in adults and older children in the United States.[1] It is also the type that will most commonly require surgical intervention, comprising over 80% of cases.[2] Membranous ventricular septal defects are more common than muscular ventricular septal defects, and are the most common congenital cardiac anomaly.[3] Ventricular septal defect is usually symptomless at birth. It usually manifests a few weeks after birth. VSD is an acyanotic congenital heart defect, aka a left-to-right shunt, so there are no signs of cyanosis in the early stage. However, uncorrected VSD can increase pulmonary resistance leading to the reversal of the shunt and corresponding cyanosis. The restrictive VSDs (smaller defects) are associated with a louder murmur and more palpable thrill (grade IV murmur). Larger defects may eventually … Continue reading

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