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Category Archives: Future Medicine

Medical practitioner Conferences

Posted: November 21, 2017 at 10:32 am

The purpose behind this message is to welcome you at the upcoming “May 21-22, 2018 Osaka, Japan” which will be held on May 11-12, 2018 at Osaka, Japan.

This gathering manages the one of a kind technique for Medicine and its inventive procedures. The conference is a two-day event, comprised of Keynote Presentations, Poster, Oral talks, Symposia, Workshop, Scientific meetings and Exhibitions in the field of Medicine and Surgery, for an Exhibitions and workshops.
Sessions at the conference are designed to cover a broad spectrum of subjects in oncology and you are free to choose one and inform us at your convenience.
Physicians Meet 2018 Emphasizes on:
General Physicians Meet, Surgical Nursing, Cardiology and Vascular Surgery, Psychology and Psychiatric disorders, Dental, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Pediatric Nephrology, Neurology and Brain disorders, Oncology, Ophthalmology and Vision Science etc.

For more details Visit: https://annualmeeting.conferenceseries.com/physicians/
Looking forward for your reply
Thanks and regards
Alicia Fernando
Program Manager
Medical practitioner Conferences
+1-6508894686 ext 6059, 6060
Conferenceseries LLC
Kemp House, 152 City Road,
London EC1V 2NX, UK.
E-mail: [email protected]

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Future medicine-makers get a peek into the industry – Andover Townsman

Posted: August 25, 2017 at 7:41 am

It isn’t often that you see teens huddled around beakers and graduated cylinders, looking at chemistry equations, wearing slightly over-sized lab coats over their jeans and sneakers. Outside of a classroom, that is.

But high school students got to do just that, in a real laboratory, working alongside real scientists, just last week.

The Eisai Andover innovative Medicines Institute (AiM) on Corporate Drive is a facility where scientists from many different sciences work to develop medicines for diseases such as Alzheimers and cancer. AiM is a part of Eisai, an international human health care company that creates products and conducts medicine research.

AiM held a week-long event for high school students to educate them about medicine and science on the week of Aug. 14.The event was put together by Nadeem Sarwar, president of AiM.

Sarwar had done this a few years ago and it was very successful,” said Sarah Buco, senior human resources manager of Eisai US. “It was a similar approach that was hands-on, but also had lectures, almost like science camp.”

Students listened to lectures, participated in experiments like synthesizing aspirin, and prepared a presentation based on research during their time at AiM.

We want to inspire the next generation of medicine makers,” said Sarwar. “We feel privileged that our job is to make medicines. We are trying to find cures for Alzheimers and cancer, and we’re very proud that that’s our job. We want to make sure making medicines is a career that young people have in mind.”

It’s been a lot of fun for them and even more so for us,” added Sarwar. “Trying to communicate to high school children what you do in an engaging way isn’t easy, we’re very used to our scientific jargon. It’s a chance for us to step back and think about what we really do and why. I think the kids are having fun, both learning the number of things it takes to make medicine, but also getting their hands dirty.”

All of the AiM employees who participated in the event did so on a volunteer basis, which ended up being about 20 scientists.

“I volunteered because I’ve always wanted to be involved in education as well. I’m here to help inspire the next generation the way I was inspired, said Branko Mitasev, principal scientist in chemistry at AiM.

Another volunteer, Noel Taylor, a scientist for AiM, added: Its a great opportunity for students to see in real life what goes on at a pharmaceuticalcompany. I wish they had a program like this when I was going through high school.”

A total of nine high school students from grades 9-12 attended the event.

“We want to make sure we’re communicating the diversity of science that goes into making medicine,”Sarwar said.”It’s very broad spanning biology, chemistry, genetics, and a number of other sciences. The other thing is culture. We are very proud of the diversity of cultures that are under our roof. We have people from several continents. We have interns from Scotland, from England, from Japan, from local high schools. One key exposure we want to give to people is the multicultural environment and the dynamic environment you get to work in with drug discovery.”

The opportunity was open to friends and family of AiM workers, but based on the success of last week’s session, more similar events may be open to the public in the future.

Our hope that if this is successful and our feeling is that it has been, we would do it repeatedly. It’s the second time we’ve done something like this and we’d like to expand it,” Sarwar said.

“There is definitely a passion around energizing people around the medicines and sciences here. It’s definitely a passion of Nadeem’s. In the last few years he has really looked for opportunities to educate students and get them excited and passionate about the idea of working in science and being a scientist or having a STEM job,” said Buco.

Follow Kelsey Bode on Twitter @Kelsey_Bode

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The best way to fix broken bones might be with glass – BBC News

Posted: August 9, 2017 at 6:49 pm

In 2002, Ian Thompson, a specialist in facial reconstruction at Kings College, London, received an urgent phone call. A patient in his late 20s had been struck by an out-of-control car mounting the pavement. The impact had sent him catapulting over the bonnet of the car, smashing his face and shattering the fragile orbital floor the tiny bone, no more than 1mm thick, which holds the eyeball in place in the skull.

Without the orbital floor, your eye moves backwards into the skull, almost as a defensive mechanism, Thompson explains. But this results in blurred vision and lack of focus. This patient had also lost the ability to perceive colour. His job involved rewiring aircraft and as he could no longer detect a red wire from a blue one, hed barely been able to work in three years.

The accident had happened three years earlier. Since then, surgeons had desperately tried to reconstruct the bony floor and push the eye back into position, first using material implants and then bone from the patients own rib. Both attempts had failed. Each time, infection set in after a few months, causing extreme pain. And now the doctors were out of ideas.

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Thompsons answer was to build the worlds first glass implant, moulded as a plate which slotted in under the patients eye into the collapsed orbital floor. The idea of using glass a naturally brittle material to repair something so delicate may seem counterintuitive.

But this was no ordinary glass.

If you placed a piece of window glass in the human body, it would be sealed off by scar tissue, basically wobble around in the body for a while and then get pushed out, says Julian Jones, an expert in bioglass at Imperial College London. When you put bioglass in the body, it starts to dissolve and releases ions which kind of talk to the immune system and tell the cells what to do. This means the body doesnt recognise it as foreign, and so it bonds to bone and soft tissue, creating a good feel and stimulating the production of new bone.

Bioglass actually works even better than the patients own bone Ian Thompson

For Thompson, the results were immediate. Almost instantaneously, the patient regained full vision, colour and depth perception. Fifteen years on, he remains in full health.

Thompson has gone on to use bioglass plates to successfully treat more than 100 patients involved in car or motorcycle accidents. Bioglass actually works even better than the patients own bone, Thompson says. This is because weve found that it slowly leaches sodium ions as it dissolves, killing off bacteria in the local environment. So, quite by chance, you have this mild antibiotic effect which eliminates infections.

Cutting edge

Bioglass was invented by US scientist Larry Hench in 1969. Hench was inspired by a chance conversation on a bus with an army colonel who recently had returned from the Vietnam War. The colonel told Hench that while modern medical technology could save lives on the battlefield, it could not save limbs. Hench decided to shelve his research into intercontinental ballistic missiles and instead work on designing a bionic material which would not be rejected by the human body.

Hench ultimately took his research to London, and it has been in Britain where some of the most revolutionary bioglass innovations are being made in fields from orthopaedic surgery to dentistry.

Over the last 10 years, surgeons have used bioglass in a powdered form, which looks and feels like a gritty putty, to repair bone defects arising from small fractures. Since 2010, this same bioglass putty has hit the high street as the key component in Sensodynes Repair and Protect toothpaste, the biggest global use of any bioactive material. During the brushing process, the bioglass dissolves and releases calcium phosphate ions which bond to tooth mineral. Over time, they slowly stimulate regrowth.

But many scientists feel that the current applications of bioglass are barely scratching the surface of what could be possible. New clinical products are being developed which could revolutionise bone and joint surgery like never before.

Sitting in his office in Imperial Colleges Department of Materials, Jones is holding a small, cube-shaped object hes dubbed bouncy bioglass. Its similar to the current bioglass but with a slight twist: subtle alterations in the chemical composition mean its no longer brittle. Instead it bounces,like a kids power ball as Jones describes it, and its incredibly flexible.

The point of this is that it can be inserted into a badly broken leg and can support both the patients weight and allow them to walk on it without crutches, without requiring any additional metal pins or implants for support. At the same time, the bouncy bioglass also will stimulate and guide bone regrowth while slowly, naturally assimilating into the body.

To regenerate large pieces of bone, for example in a really big fracture, its very important to be able to put weight on your leg, Jones says. And its really important that the bio-implant in your leg is able to transmit the force from your weight to the bone cells, like a signal. Our body makes its own bone in the architecture that its in, because the cells feel the mechanical environment. So to grow back a big piece of bone you need to be able to transmit the right signals to them. The reason why astronauts in space lose bone mass is because without gravity, the cells arent receiving the same information as they do on Earth.

Further alterations to the chemical makeup of bioglass produce a different form which is much softer and has an almost rubbery feel. It feels almost like a piece of squid at a seafood restaurant. This bioglass is designed for possibly the holy grail of orthopaedic surgery: cartilage repair.

Right now, surgeons attempt to repair damaged cartilage in arthritic hips or damaged knee joints with a fiddly procedure called microfracture. This involves smoothing over the damaged area to expose the bone underneath, then pricking it to release stem cells from the bone marrow which stimulate repair. But this results in scar cartilage and within a few years, as many athletes have found, the original problem returns.

As a solution, Jones is looking to produce bioglass which can be 3D-printed and then slotted into any hole in the cartilage. For the cells to accept it, the material must retain all the natural properties of cartilage. To test its effectiveness, Jones uses a simulator that has human knee joints from cadavers donated for medical research.

We simulate the walking action, bending, all the things a knee would do, and make sure that the bioglass actually preserves the rest of the joint and behaves as it should do, he says. If that works then well proceed to animal and then clinical trials.

This same bioglass could find an additional use in aiding people with chronic back pain due to herniated discs. At the moment surgeons treat this by replacing the dysfunctional disc with a bone graft which fuses the vertebrae in the back together. But while this takes away the pain, it results in a considerable loss in mobility. Instead, a bioglass implant could be printed and simply inserted to replace the faulty disc.

It seems the obvious thing to do, Jones says. So far nobody has been able to replicate the mechanical properties of cartilage synthetically. But with bioglass, we think we can do it.

Weve just got to prove that we can. If all goes well and we pass all the necessary safety tests, it could reach the clinic in 10 years.

Using man-made materials which can fuse to the body may seem far-fetched but it is appearing to be a more and more likely component of future medicine. Already, millions of people brush their teeth with it. And that may just be the start.

This story is a part of BBC Britain a series focused on exploring this extraordinary island, one story at a time. Readers outside of the UK can see every BBC Britain story by heading to theBritain homepage; you also can see our latest stories by following us onFacebookandTwitter.

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Posted: April 7, 2016 at 7:45 am

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Antimicrobial resistance in the 21st century — Future Microbiology special focus issue

Posted: March 31, 2015 at 2:50 pm

March 30, 2015 – There are few global public health issues of greater importance than antimicrobial resistance in terms of impact on society. Many existing antimicrobials are becoming less effective and the development pipeline for new antibiotics is at an all-time low. Thus, change is needed to address antimicrobial resistance. This complex global public health challenge is tackled in a timely special focus issue of Future Microbiology, a peer-reviewed journal published by Future Medicine Ltd.

Modern medicine relies on the widespread availability of effective antimicrobials to prevent and treat infections in humans and animals. However, resistance to all antimicrobials is growing; bacterial resistance to antibiotics being of the greatest concern. Microbial evolution cannot be outpaced, therefore, the solution will involve global collaboration and a more intelligent use of antibiotics.

Future Microbiology’s special focus issue brings together experts in the field to contribute on a broad range of topics to create a comprehensive update on antimicrobial resistance.

It includes a range of Reviews, Perspectives, Editorials and Primary Research papers that cover some of the ways in which we can address this problem. Coverage includes tools for screening and surveillance, to alternative therapeutic options.

“Antimicrobial resistance is a highly important public health concern, and its spread is complex and difficult to be completely prevented. Therefore, reinforcement of infection control tasks, along with in-time initiation of diagnosis and new therapeutic options are of utmost importance,” said Natasha Leeson, Commissioning editor. “This Special Focus Issue reviews the existing evidence base on antimicrobial resistance, and highlights on-going and future research endeavors that may further strengthen the possibilities of containing antimicrobial resistance in the near future.”

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A full listing of articles included in the issue is available at: http://www.futuremedicine.com/toc/fmb/10/3

Notes for editors

About Future Microbiology

The journal publishes original research, reviews and opinion pieces that cover all aspects of microbiological sciences, including virology, bacteriology, parasitology and mycology. Essential information is delivered in concise, at-a-glance article formats. Key advances in the field are reported and analyzed by international experts, providing an authoritative but accessible forum for this increasingly important and vast area of research.

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Future of Medicine [Ae Template] – Video

Posted: March 10, 2015 at 3:48 am



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Future Science Group commemorates a 15-year commitment to double-blind peer review

Posted: at 3:48 am

IMAGE:Future Science Group is a progressive publisher focused on breakthrough medical, biotechnological, and scientific research. view more

Credit: Future Science Group

February 5, 2015 – Future Science Group today announced that it will continue to require double-blind peer review for research articles submitted to all 34 professional journals published by both of its imprints, Future Science and Future Medicine. FSG has employed the use of double-blind peer review since the launch of the company’s first journal, Pharmacogenomics, in 2000.

“Rigorous peer review policies have always been fundamental to our goal of publishing high-quality scientific information in all of our journals,” said Phil Garner, Managing Director of Future Science Group. “While other journals are just now moving to this model of review, our journals have followed the double blind system for over 15 years, in order to remove any bias from the process.”

Recently, a few major scientific journals have announced plans to use double-blind review, in which both the authors and the reviewers are made anonymous. Future Science Group journals have always followed the double-blind system in order to remove bias, intentional or unintentional, from the process.

Single blind peer review is still used by many scientific journals. In single-blind peer review, manuscripts are sent to reviewers for assessment with the authors’ information included, but the peer reviewers themselves are anonymous.

“By also making authors anonymous, all research is evaluated on a level playing field, regardless of whether the researchers are well known in their field, are early in their -career researchers, are women or are from minority groups,” said Phil Garner. “Peer review is a process that relies on the integrity of all those involved, and we thank doctors and researchers for their willingness to give up their valuable time to ensure the integrity of scientific publications over the past 15 years.”

As well as conducting double-blind review, Future Science Group also aims to obtain a minimum of three reviewers for each submission, to ensure each paper is thoroughly assessed before a publication decision is made.

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About Future Science Group

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Future Science Group Commemorates a Fifteen-Year Commitment to Double Blind Peer Review, Offering a Level Playing …

Posted: March 5, 2015 at 6:52 am

(PRWEB UK) 5 March 2015

Future Science Group today announced that it will continue to require double-blind peer review for research articles submitted to all 34 professional journals published by both of its imprints, Future Science and Future Medicine. FSG has employed the use of double-blind peer review since the launch of the companys first journal, Pharmacogenomics, in 2000.

Rigorous peer review policies have always been fundamental to our goal of publishing high-quality scientific information in all of our journals, said Phil Garner, Managing Director of Future Science Group. While other journals are just now moving to this model of review, our journals have followed the double blind system for over 15 years, in order to remove any bias from the process.

Recently, a few major scientific journals have announced plans to use double-blind review, in which both the authors and the reviewers are made anonymous. Future Science Group journals have always followed the double-blind system in order to remove bias, intentional or unintentional, from the process.

Single blind peer review is still used by many scientific journals. In single-blind peer review, manuscripts are sent to reviewers for assessment with the authors information included, but the peer reviewers themselves are anonymous.

By also making authors anonymous, all research is evaluated on a level playing field, regardless of whether the researchers are well known in their field, are early in their -career researchers, are women or are from minority groups, said Phil Garner. Peer review is a process that relies on the integrity of all those involved, and we thank doctors and researchers for their willingness to give up their valuable time to ensure the integrity of scientific publications over the past 15 years.

As well as conducting double-blind review, Future Science Group also aims to obtain a minimum of three reviewers for each submission, to ensure each paper is thoroughly assessed before a publication decision is made.

About Future Science Group

Founded in 2001, Future Science Group (FSG) is a progressive publisher focused on breakthrough medical, biotechnological, and scientific research. FSGs portfolio includes two imprints, Future Science and Future Medicine. Both publish eBooks and journals. In addition to this core publishing business FSG develops specialist eCommunities. Key titles and sites include Bioanalysis Zone, Epigenomics, Nanomedicine and the award-winning Regenerative Medicine.

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$500K bill for future medicine students

Posted: March 3, 2015 at 6:50 am

New modelling shows babies born this year wanting to be doctors face medicine degrees over $500,000.

Babies born this year who want to be doctors when they grow up could face a bill of more than $500,000 for their time at university, new modelling shows.

That pricetag, in 2015 dollars, includes sharehouse rent paid during a six-year degree, university fees and other costs associated with studying like buying a computer and textbooks.

The Australian Scholarships Group, which released the modelling on Tuesday, says someone who starts a six-year medicine degree in 2033 and lives away from home will pay $508,546.

The cost is more than double what a medicine student in similar circumstances starting their degree this year would pay.

ASG calculates university fees would rise from $70,325 for the six years starting now to $177,620 (in 2015 dollars) for a medicine degree started in 2033.

A 2033 first year university student living at home would pay $267,875 over the lifetime of their degree.

But ASG chief executive John Velegrinis points out it’s not always possible for students to stay at home and reduce costs.

“For students in regional Australia or those looking to travel interstate for further study, the financial impact is higher,” he said.

“They have to factor in the costs of accommodation as well as increased university fees.”

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Future Science Group Launches New Open Access Journal: Concussion

Posted: February 24, 2015 at 2:46 am

(PRWEB UK) 24 February 2015

Future Science Group (FSG) has launched Concussion, a new open access journal that publishes original research, reviews and commentaries addressing the assessment, management and short and long term implications of this subset of traumatic brain injury, which is gaining increasing attention.

As professional sports leagues and parents of young athletes alike are placing more emphasis on concussion prevention and protocol, exciting developments in biomarker research are shedding new light on how to gauge the severity of concussions immediately after injury, as well as indicating future prognosis, said Commissioning Editor Hannah Wilson. Using the open access model, we hope to make the latest advances in basic, translational and clinical research in the field available to the broadest possible audience of readers.

Topics covered by Concussion include:

Concussion will be supported by an international editorial board consisting of leading experts in the field. Board member Steven P. Broglio, University of Michigan, MI, USA explained: Concussions have become a critical public health issue, resulting in a substantial increase in research. For a clinician searching for the most up-to-date information, Concussion can serve as the go-to journal.

The journal will consider publication of original research, review and opinion articles. All articles submitted to Concussion are subject to peer review by a minimum of three independent experts. Unsolicited article proposals are welcomed and authors are required to comply fully with the journal’s Disclosure & Conflict of Interest Policy as well as major publishing guidelines, including ICMJE and GPP2.The journal follows a gold open access model, publishing all articles under the Creative Commons CC-BY license to allow maximum dissemination.

To submit an article, or for further information, contact the Commissioning Editor Hannah Wilson: hannah.wilson(AT)futuremedicine.com.

About Future Science Group

Founded in 2001, Future Science Group (FSG) is a progressive publisher focused on breakthrough medical, biotechnological and scientific research. FSGs portfolio includes two imprints, Future Science and Future Medicine. Both publish eBooks and journals. In addition to this core publishing portfolios, FSG develops specialist eCommunities. Key titles and sites include Bioanalysis Zone, Epigenomics, Nanomedicine and the award-winning Regenerative Medicine.

The aim of FSG is to service the advancement of clinical practice and drug research by enhancing the efficiency of communications among clinicians, researchers and decision-makers, and by providing innovative solutions to their information needs. This is achieved through a customer-centric approach, use of new technologies, products that deliver value-for-money and uncompromisingly high standards. http://www.futuresciencegroup.com

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Future Science Group Launches New Open Access Journal: Concussion

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