Page 11234..1020..»

Category Archives: Genetic Engineering

Americans OK with Genetic Modification for Health Care, but Not … – Hoosier Ag Today

Posted: August 29, 2017 at 4:44 pm

More than three-quarters of Americans would accept release of genetically modified mosquitoes to decrease risk of the Zika virus, but fewer than half accept genetic modification (GM) of animals, grain crops and produce, according to a Purdue University study. Nicole Olynk Widmar, associate professor of agricultural economics, and Wally Tyner, the James and Lois Ackerman Professor of Agricultural Economics, led the study to understand attitudes toward genetic engineering in the wake of last years heightened coverage of the Zika virus. The results suggest people are far more accepting of genetic modifications that benefit human health but are still somewhat wary of modifications to food. Whenever you have a newly perceived health risk, there are calls for technology to solve the problem. If you think about the Ebola virus, everybody said, Wheres an Ebola vaccine? They wanted technology to mitigate the risk, Widmar said. Food is an everyday choice. In some ways, I can understand why people may be more cautious about what theyre ingesting on an ongoing basis.Data also show that acceptance of genetic modification may be related to sex, education, income and awareness of GM technology. Zika, a virus spread primarily through mosquito bites, can cause severe birth defects … Continue reading

Posted in Genetic Engineering | Comments Off on Americans OK with Genetic Modification for Health Care, but Not … – Hoosier Ag Today

Around the web: Concerns with human genetic engineering, Gary … – American Enterprise Institute

Posted: August 28, 2017 at 10:41 pm

Should we welcome human genetic engineering? Tyler Cowen If you could directly alter your kids genetic profile, what would you want? Its hard to know how the social debate would turn out after years of back and forth, but I was dismayed to read one recent research paper by psychologists Rachel M. Latham and Sophie von Stumm. The descriptive title of that work, based on survey evidence, is Mothers want extraversion over conscientiousness or intelligence for their children. Upon reflection, maybe that isnt so surprising, because parents presumably want children who are fun to spend time with. Would a more extroverted human race be desirable, all things considered? I genuinely dont know, but at the very least I am concerned. The current mix of human personalities and institutions is a delicate balance which, for all of its flaws, has allowed society to survive and progress. Im not looking to make a big roll of the dice on this one. Amazon robots bring a brave new world to the warehouse The Financial Times Another way to look at US wage growth The Financial Times The robot tax gains another advocate Wired Kim got the idea of a robot tax from Bill … Continue reading

Posted in Genetic Engineering | Comments Off on Around the web: Concerns with human genetic engineering, Gary … – American Enterprise Institute

Genetic engineering: upgrading to human 2.0 – T3

Posted: at 10:41 pm

There are two ways to upgrade a human - tinker with biology or augment with technology. So when the time comes to upgrade to human 2.0, should we become Bioshock-style splicers or Halo-esque spartans? This week we look at the science behind a genetic boost. Science fiction isnt afraid to mess with genetics. Bioshocks ADAM is a syrup of stem cells augmented with plasmids that carry superhuman genetic traits. Preys Neuromod enhances cognitive abilities by splicing alien genetics into viruses delivered directly into the brain through the eyes. And Prototype's Blacklight gets in to cells and tweaks their genetic code, activating and editing dormant sequences. So how close are we to game-changing genetic upgrades? (Image: I.C. Baianu et al.) The genetic revolution started in the 1950s with two wily Cambridge scientists. With data nabbed from colleagues in London, Watson and Crick deciphered the structure of DNA and opened Pandoras box. Since then, the field has moved fast, and it's littered with Nobel Prizes. By the mid 1970s, scientists had discovered DNA-snipping molecular scissors known as restriction enzymes, and DNA-stitching enzymes called ligases. It became possible to cut and splice the genetic code, stitching components from different organisms to create recombinant … Continue reading

Posted in Genetic Engineering | Comments Off on Genetic engineering: upgrading to human 2.0 – T3

The drive for the perfect offspring can get scary – Chicago Tribune

Posted: at 10:41 pm

There's a lot of innovation going on in China these days, but perhaps not all of it is good. Chinese fertility centers are going well beyond American practices, using genetic diagnosis to influence how children conceived through in vitro fertilization will turn out. On one hand, the potential for improving human health is enormous. On the other hand, I am uneasy at the prospect of the power this gives parents. I don't trust people to take so much control over the future of human nature. Sometimes you hear it argued that the complex nature of genes will prevent major feats of genetic engineering. That may be selling short future advances in Big Data and biomedicine, but even minor changes in genetic diagnosis and selection could have significant effects. Maybe you can't choose to have a child who will be happy, but you might be able to lower the chance of your kid having depression or social anxiety by some small amount. Over the course of generations, that will exert great influence over the nature of the human experience. One risk, of course, is that parents will opt for some apparently desirable qualities in their children, and then the experiment will … Continue reading

Posted in Genetic Engineering | Comments Off on The drive for the perfect offspring can get scary – Chicago Tribune

Activists criticise recommendation on GM mustard by Genetic … – The New Indian Express

Posted: at 10:41 pm

NEW DELHI: Activists today criticised the biotech regulator GEAC's decision to recommend commercial use of genetically modified mustard in a submission to the environment ministry. Coalition for a GM-Free India said it is no coincidence that credible committees are asking to stop the introduction of GM crops. Their comments came a day after a parliamentary panel said that no GM crop should be introduced in India unless the bio-safety and socio-economic desirability is evaluated in a "transparent" process and an accountability regime is put in place. The department-related parliamentary standing committee on science and technology and environment and forest chaired by Congress leader Renuka Chowdhury made its recommendations in its 301st report on 'GM crop and its impact on environment'. The panel's comment came in the wake of India's GM crop regulator Genetic Engineering Appraisal Committee (GEAC) recently recommending the commercial use of genetically modified mustard in a submission to the environment ministry. The coalition said the latest report is a reiteration in many ways of what earlier committees like the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Agriculture (2012 and 2013) had said as well as the majority report of the Supreme Court's Technical Expert Committee (2013). "The fact that certain unacceptable … Continue reading

Posted in Genetic Engineering | Comments Off on Activists criticise recommendation on GM mustard by Genetic … – The New Indian Express

The Impossible Burger wouldn’t be possible without genetic engineering – Grist

Posted: August 12, 2017 at 11:41 am

The Impossible Burger has had a charmed honeymoon period. Crowds of foodies surged into fancy eateries to try it. Environmentalists and animal rights activists swooned. So did investors: Impossible Foods brought in $75 million during its latest investment round. Now the backlash is here. The activist organizations Friends of the Earth and the ETC Group dug up documents which they claim show that Impossible Foods ignored FDA warnings about safety and they handed them over to the New York Times. The ensuing story depicted Impossible Foods as a culinary version of Uber disrupting so rapidly that its running headlong into government regulators. In reality, Impossible Foods has behaved like a pedestrian food company, working hand in hand with the FDA and following a well-worn path to comply with an arcane set of rules. So why isnt this story a nothingburger? In a word: GMOs. You see, soy leghemoglobin, or SLH, the key ingredient that makes the Impossible Burger uniquely meaty, is churned out by genetically modified yeast. This is a protein produced with genetic engineering; its a new food ingredient, Dana Perls, senior food and technology campaigner at Friends of the Earth, told me when I asked why theyd singled … Continue reading

Posted in Genetic Engineering | Comments Off on The Impossible Burger wouldn’t be possible without genetic engineering – Grist

Gene Editing Might Mean My Brother Would’ve Never Existed – TIME

Posted: August 11, 2017 at 6:42 am

On August 2nd, scientists achieved a milestone on the path to human genetic engineering. For the first time in the United States, scientists successfully edited the genes of a human embryo. A transpacific team of researchers used CRISPR-Cas9 to correct a mutation that leads to an often devastating heart condition. Responses to this feat followed well-trodden trails. Hype over designer babies. Hope over new tools to cure and curb disease. Some spin, some substance and a good dose of science-speak. But for me, this breakthrough is not just about science or medicine or the future of humankind. Its about faith and family, love and loss. Most of all, its about the life and memory of my brother. Jason was born with muscle-eye-brain disease. In his case, this included muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, severe nearsightedness, hydrocephalus and intellectual disability. He lived past his first year thanks to marvels of modern medicine. A shunt surgery to drain excess cerebrospinal fluid building up around his brain took six attempts, but the seventh succeeded. Aside from those surgeries complications and intermittent illnesses due to a less-than-robust immune system, Jason was healthy. Healthy and happy very happy. His smile could light up a room. Yet, … Continue reading

Posted in Genetic Engineering | Comments Off on Gene Editing Might Mean My Brother Would’ve Never Existed – TIME

When genetic engineering is the environmentally friendly choice – GreenBiz

Posted: at 6:42 am

This article originally ran on Ensia. Which is more disruptive to a plant: genetic engineering or conventional breeding? It often surprises people to learn that GE commonly causes less disruption to plants than conventional techniques of breeding. But equally profound is the realization that the latest GE techniques, coupled with a rapidly expanding ability to analyze massive amounts of genetic material, allow us to make super-modest changes in crop plant genes that will enable farmers to produce more food with fewer adverse environmental impacts. Such super-modest changes are possible with CRISPR-based genome editing, a powerful set of new genetic tools that is leading a revolution in biology. My interest in GE crops stems from my desire to provide more effective and sustainable plant disease control for farmers worldwide. Diseases often destroy 10 to 15 percent of potential crop production, resulting in global losses of billions of dollars annually. The risk of disease-related losses provides an incentive to farmers to use disease-control products such as pesticides. One of my strongest areas of expertise is in the use of pesticides for disease control. Pesticides certainly can be useful in farming systems worldwide, but they have significant downsides from a sustainability perspective. Used … Continue reading

Posted in Genetic Engineering | Comments Off on When genetic engineering is the environmentally friendly choice – GreenBiz

It’s Time to Stop Asking Whether Human Genetic Engineering Should Happen and Start Planning to Manage it Safely – HuffPost

Posted: at 6:42 am

The DNA of early human embryos carrying a sequence leading to hypertrophic cardiomyopathya potentially deadly heart defecthas been edited to ensure they would carry a healthy DNA sequence if brought to term. The Nature paper announcing this has reenergized a terrific national and international debate over whether permanent changes in DNA that can be passed from one generation to another should be made. Bioethicists are asking, Should we genetically engineer children? while some potential parents are almost certainly asking, When will this technique be available? The Should questions bioethicists are asking are probably not relevant. The only question whose answer ultimately matters is: Can techniques like CRISP-R be used to genetically engineer children safely? Because a variety of forces guarantee that if they can be, they will be. The key questions reliable practitioners must answer are: Can we prove it works? Then: Can it be used safely?. If yes on these questions, then we will see: Who is marketing this technique to potential parents? Finally, we will learn: Where was it done, who did it, and who paid for its use? We are closer than ever before to using CRISP-R to replace dangerous DNA sequences with those that wont keep … Continue reading

Posted in Genetic Engineering | Comments Off on It’s Time to Stop Asking Whether Human Genetic Engineering Should Happen and Start Planning to Manage it Safely – HuffPost

When genetic engineering is the environmentally friendly choice – Genetic Literacy Project

Posted: August 7, 2017 at 8:42 pm

Thisarticleoriginally appeared at Ensia and has been republished here with permission. Which is more disruptive to a plant: genetic engineering or conventional breeding? It often surprises people to learn that GE commonly causes less disruption to plants than conventional techniques of breeding. But equally profound is the realization that the latest GE techniques, coupled with a rapidly expanding ability to analyze massive amounts of genetic material, allow us to make super-modest changes in crop plant genes that will enable farmers to produce more food with fewer adverse environmental impacts. Such super-modest changes are possible with CRISPR-based genome editing, a powerful set of new genetic tools that is leading a revolution in biology. My interest in GE crops stems from my desire to provide more effective and sustainable plant disease control for farmers worldwide. Diseases often destroy 10 to 15 percent of potential crop production, resulting in global losses of billions of dollars annually. The risk of disease-related losses provides an incentive to farmers to use disease-control products such as pesticides. One of my strongest areas of expertise is in the use of pesticides for disease control. Pesticides certainly can be useful in farming systems worldwide, but they have significant downsides … Continue reading

Posted in Genetic Engineering | Comments Off on When genetic engineering is the environmentally friendly choice – Genetic Literacy Project

Page 11234..1020..»