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Brain Injury Diagnosis | Traumatic Brain Injury | Brain …

Posted: September 19, 2018 at 5:45 pm

Anyone with signs of moderate or severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) should receive medical attention as soon as possible. Little can be done to reverse the brain damage caused by an accident or injury, but healthcare workers try to keep the injured person’s condition stable and prevent further injury. If you or a loved one has a TBI, your healthcare team will work to: Imaging tests help to diagnose TBI. Continue reading

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Vascular Biology 2019 – NAVBO

Posted: at 5:45 pm

October 27-31, 2019Asilomar Conference Grounds in Monterey, CAKeynote Lecture by Hal Dietz, Johns Hopkins Medical Center:Leveraging Natures Success: Lessons from Modifiers of Cardiovascular DiseaseWorkshops:Developmental Vascular Biology and Genetics Workshop VIII Organized by Victoria Bautch, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill Co-organizer: Courtney Griffin, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundations Organized by Kayla Bayless, Texas A&M Health Science Center and Marlene Rabinovitch, Stanford University Co-organizers: Christopher Breuer, Nationwide Children’s Hospital and Linda Demer, University of California, Los Angeles Organized by Walter Lee Murfee, University of Florida Earl P. Continue reading

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PPARs and Their Emerging Role in Vascular Biology …

Posted: at 5:45 pm

AbstractFor many years, advances in understanding steroid hormone action typically proceeded through sequential stages that involved first identifying the role of a putative hormone, then isolating it, often from large quantities of body fluid, and ultimately identifying the nuclear receptor through which the cellular effects were being achieved (1). More recently, this stepwise progression has been reversed by modern molecular biology techniques allowing rapid identification of many genes as encoding nuclear receptors based on structural motifs even without any information regarding the functional role of these so called orphan receptors Continue reading

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Lower vascular plant | biology | Britannica.com

Posted: at 5:45 pm

Alternative Titles:Pteridophyta, cryptogam, pteridophyte, seedless vascular plant, vascular cryptogam Lower vascular plant, formerly pteridophyte, also called vascular cryptogam, any of the spore-bearing vascular plants, including the ferns, club mosses, spike mosses, quillworts, horsetails, and whisk ferns. Once considered of the same evolutionary line, these plants were formerly placed in the single group Pteridophyta and were known as the ferns and fern allies. Although modern studies have shown that the plants are not in fact related, these terms are still used in discussion of the lower vascular plants. Continue reading

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Cerebral Palsy Treatment – What Treatment Works Best?

Posted: at 5:44 pm

Treatment for cerebral palsy is multifaceted, often requiring multiple doctors and therapies. Early treatment usually has the greatest chance of improving a childs condition.Understanding Cerebral Palsy Treatment The purpose of treatment for cerebral palsy is to promote the most normal, manageable and healthy life possible. This is accomplished through treatments that allow people with cerebral palsy to maximize their independence in daily life. Continue reading

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Cerebral Palsy Treatment | Cerebral Palsy Guidance

Posted: at 5:44 pm

Cerebral palsy is a neuromuscular disorder that currently has no cure. However, there are a number of treatment options available to help your child improve their daily life. Treatment will depend upon the type cerebral palsy your child has, as well as the severity of the condition. Continue reading

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Cerebral palsy – Diagnosis and treatment – Mayo Clinic

Posted: at 5:44 pm

Diagnosis If your family doctor or pediatrician suspects your child has cerebral palsy, he or she will evaluate your child’s signs and symptoms, review your child’s medical history, and conduct a physical evaluation. Your doctor may refer you to a specialist trained in treating children with brain and nervous system conditions (pediatric neurologist). Your doctor will also order a series of tests to make a diagnosis and rule out other possible causes Continue reading

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Heart – Wikipedia

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Heart The human heart The heart is a muscular organ in most animals, which pumps blood through the blood vessels of the circulatory system.[1] Blood provides the body with oxygen and nutrients, as well as assists in the removal of metabolic wastes. Continue reading

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Hypertension – Wikipedia

Posted: at 5:44 pm

HypertensionSynonymsArterial hypertension, high blood pressureAutomated arm blood pressure meter showing arterial hypertension (shown a systolic blood pressure 158mmHg, diastolic blood pressure 99mmHg and heart rate of 80 beats per minute)SpecialtyCardiologySymptomsNone[1]ComplicationsCoronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, vision loss, chronic kidney disease, dementia[2][3][4]CausesUsually lifestyle and genetic factors[5][6]Risk factorsExcess salt, excess body weight, smoking, alcohol[1][5]Diagnostic methodResting blood pressure130/80 or 140/90mmHg[5][7]TreatmentLifestyle changes, medications[8]Frequency1637% globally[5]Deaths9.4 million / 18% (2010)[9] Hypertension (HTN or HT), also known as high blood pressure (HBP), is a long-term medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries is persistently elevated.[10] High blood pressure usually does not cause symptoms.[1] Long-term high blood pressure, however, is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, peripheral vascular disease, vision loss, chronic kidney disease, and dementia.[2][3][4][11] High blood pressure is classified as either primary (essential) high blood pressure or secondary high blood pressure.[5] About 9095% of cases are primary, defined as high blood pressure due to nonspecific lifestyle and genetic factors.[5][6] Lifestyle factors that increase the risk include excess salt in the diet, excess body weight, smoking, and alcohol use.[1][5] The remaining 510% of cases are categorized as secondary high blood pressure, defined as high blood pressure due to an identifiable cause, such as chronic kidney disease, narrowing of the kidney arteries, an endocrine disorder, or the use of birth control pills.[5] Blood pressure is expressed by two measurements, the systolic and diastolic pressures, which are the maximum and minimum pressures, respectively.[1] For most adults, normal blood pressure at rest is within the range of 100130 millimeters mercury (mmHg) systolic and 6080 mmHg diastolic.[7][12] For most adults, high blood pressure is present if the resting blood pressure is persistently at or above 130/80 or 140/90 mmHg.[5][7] Different numbers apply to children.[13] Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring over a 24-hour period appears more accurate than office-based blood pressure measurement.[5][10] Lifestyle changes and medications can lower blood pressure and decrease the risk of health complications.[8] Lifestyle changes include weight loss, decreased salt intake, physical exercise, and a healthy diet.[5] If lifestyle changes are not sufficient then blood pressure medications are used.[8] Up to three medications can control blood pressure in 90% of people.[5] The treatment of moderately high arterial blood pressure (defined as > 160/100 mmHg) with medications is associated with an improved life expectancy.[14] The effect of treatment of blood pressure between 130/80mmHg and 160/100mmHg is less clear, with some reviews finding benefit[7][15][16] and others finding unclear benefit.[17][18][19] High blood pressure affects between 16 and 37% of the population globally.[5] In 2010 hypertension was believed to have been a factor in 18% of all deaths (9.4 million globally).[9] Hypertension is rarely accompanied by symptoms, and its identification is usually through screening, or when seeking healthcare for an unrelated problem. Continue reading

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Cardiac regeneration and repair – 1st Edition

Posted: at 5:44 pm

Cardiac Regeneration and Repair, Volume One reviews the pathology of cardiac injury and the latest advances in cell therapy. Continue reading

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