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Cerebral Palsy Definition, Symptoms, and Life Expectancy

Posted: February 12, 2018 at 4:42 am

What are specific treatment plans for cerebral palsy? After the initial evaluation, specific treatment plans are outlined for each child: If the child has seizures, the treatment is based on the type and frequency of the seizures. Complete seizure control can often be achieved using a single medication, but some children with cerebral palsy have particularly difficult-to-control seizures Continue reading

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EuroSciCon Forum For Cardiology

Posted: January 3, 2018 at 6:40 pm

EuroSciCon providing for a forum for discussing present and future challenges associated with cardiac diseases at EuroSciCon Conference on Clinical Cardiology and Cardiovascular Disease going to be schedule during May 24-25, 2018 in London, UK. The theme of this year’s … Continue reading

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The EuroSciCon will be holding its Clinical Cardiology and Cardiovascular Diseases May 24-25, 2018 London, UK

Posted: January 2, 2018 at 2:37 pm

The EuroSciCon will be holding its Clinical Cardiology and Cardiovascular Diseases May 24-25, 2018 London, UK. The theme of this year’s meeting is “Leading edge in the field of Cardiology” which will provide an international platform for discussion of present … Continue reading

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Medical practitioner Conferences

Posted: November 21, 2017 at 10:32 am

The purpose behind this message is to welcome you at the upcoming “May 21-22, 2018 Osaka, Japan” which will be held on May 11-12, 2018 at Osaka, Japan.This gathering manages the one of a kind technique for Medicine and its … Continue reading

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New Advancement in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Research

Posted: October 17, 2017 at 3:29 pm

A recent change in how well we understand stem cells may make it easier for scientists and researchers to gather stem cells for use in scientific research as well as medical application. A new study was released in the research … Continue reading

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New Stem Cell Cancer Treatment on the Horizon?

Posted: at 2:51 pm

Stem Cell Research is an amazing field right now, and promises to be a powerful and potent tool to help us live longer and healthier lives. Just last month, for example, Stem Cell Therapy was used to restore sight in … Continue reading

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Hypertension – Wikipedia

Posted: April 24, 2018 at 1:45 am

HypertensionSynonymsArterial hypertension, high blood pressureAutomated arm blood pressure meter showing arterial hypertension (shown a systolic blood pressure 158mmHg, diastolic blood pressure 99mmHg and heart rate of 80 beats per minute)SpecialtyCardiologySymptomsNone[1]ComplicationsCoronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, peripheral vascular disease, vision loss, chronic kidney disease, dementia[2][3][4]CausesUsually lifestyle and genetic factors[5][6]Risk factorsExcess salt, excess body weight, smoking, alcohol[1][5]Diagnostic methodResting blood pressure130/90 or 140/90mmHg[5][7]TreatmentLifestyle changes, medications[8]Frequency1637% globally[5]Deaths9.4 million / 18% (2010)[9] Hypertension (HTN or HT), also known as high blood pressure (HBP), is a long-term medical condition in which the blood pressure in the arteries is persistently elevated.[10] High blood pressure usually does not cause symptoms.[1] Long-term high blood pressure, however, is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke, heart failure, atrial fibrillation, peripheral vascular disease, vision loss, chronic kidney disease, and dementia.[2][3][4][11] High blood pressure is classified as either primary (essential) high blood pressure or secondary high blood pressure.[5] About 9095% of cases are primary, defined as high blood pressure due to nonspecific lifestyle and genetic factors.[5][6] Lifestyle factors that increase the risk include excess salt in the diet, excess body weight, smoking, and alcohol use.[1][5] The remaining 510% of cases are categorized as secondary high blood pressure, defined as high blood pressure due to an identifiable cause, such as chronic kidney disease, narrowing of the kidney arteries, an endocrine disorder, or the use of birth control pills.[5] Blood pressure is expressed by two measurements, the systolic and diastolic pressures, which are the maximum and minimum pressures, respectively.[1] For most adults, normal blood pressure at rest is within the range of 100130 millimeters mercury (mmHg) systolic and 6080 mmHg diastolic.[7][12] For most adults, high blood pressure is present if the resting blood pressure is persistently at or above 130/90 or 140/90 mmHg.[5][7] Different numbers apply to children.[13] Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring over a 24-hour period appears more accurate than office-based blood pressure measurement.[5][10] Lifestyle changes and medications can lower blood pressure and decrease the risk of health complications.[8] Lifestyle changes include weight loss, decreased salt intake, physical exercise, and a healthy diet.[5] If lifestyle changes are not sufficient then blood pressure medications are used.[8] Up to three medications can control blood pressure in 90% of people.[5] The treatment of moderately high arterial blood pressure (defined as > 160/100 mmHg) with medications is associated with an improved life expectancy.[14] The effect of treatment of blood pressure between 130/80mmHg and 160/100mmHg is less clear, with some reviews finding benefit[7][15][16] and others finding unclear benefit.[17][18][19] High blood pressure affects between 16 and 37% of the population globally.[5] In 2010 hypertension was believed to have been a factor in 18% of all deaths (9.4 million globally).[9] Hypertension is rarely accompanied by symptoms, and its identification is usually through screening, or when seeking healthcare for an unrelated problem. Some with high blood pressure report headaches (particularly at the back of the head and in the morning), as well as lightheadedness, vertigo, tinnitus (buzzing or hissing in the ears), altered vision or fainting episodes.[20] These symptoms, however, might be related to associated anxiety rather than the high blood pressure itself.[21] On physical examination, hypertension may be associated with the presence of changes in the optic fundus seen by ophthalmoscopy.[22] The severity of the changes typical of hypertensive retinopathy is graded from IIV; grades I and II may be difficult to differentiate.[22] The severity of the retinopathy correlates roughly with the duration or the severity of the hypertension.[20] Hypertension with certain specific additional signs and symptoms may suggest secondary hypertension, i.e. hypertension due to an identifiable cause Continue reading

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Cardiac surgery – Wikipedia

Posted: at 1:45 am

Cardiac surgery, or cardiovascular surgery, is surgery on the heart or great vessels performed by cardiac surgeons. It is often used to treat complications of ischemic heart disease (for example, with coronary artery bypass grafting); to correct congenital heart disease; or to treat valvular heart disease from various causes, including endocarditis, rheumatic heart disease, and atherosclerosis. Continue reading

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Myocardial infarction – Wikipedia

Posted: at 1:44 am

{{| name = Myocardial infarction| synonyms = Acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart attack| image = AMI scheme.png| caption = Diagram showing the blood supply to the heart by the two major blood vessels, the left and right coronary arteries (labelled LCA and RCA). A myocardial infarction (2) has occurred with blockage of a branch of the left coronary artery (1).| field = Cardiology| symptoms = Chest pain, shortness of breath, nausea, feeling faint, cold sweat, feeling tired[1]| complications = Heart failure, irregular heartbeat, cardiogenic shock, cardiac arrest[2][3]| onset = | duration = | causes = Usually coronary artery disease[2]| risks = High blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, lack of exercise, obesity, high blood cholesterol[4][5]| diagnosis = Electrocardiograms (ECGs), blood tests, coronary angiography[6]| differential = | prevention = | treatment = Percutaneous coronary intervention, thrombolysis[7]| medication = Aspirin, nitroglycerin, heparin[7][8]| prognosis = STEMI 10% risk of death (developed world)[7]| frequency = 15.9 million (2015)[9]| deaths = }}Myocardial infarction (MI), commonly known as a heart attack, occurs when blood flow decreases or stops to a part of the heart, causing damage to the heart muscle.[1] The most common symptom is chest pain or discomfort which may travel into the shoulder, arm, back, neck, or jaw.[1] Often it occurs in the center or left side of the chest and lasts for more than a few minutes.[1] The discomfort may occasionally feel like heartburn.[1] Other symptoms may include shortness of breath, nausea, feeling faint, a cold sweat, or feeling tired.[1] About 30% of people have atypical symptoms.[7] Women more often have atypical symptoms than men.[10] Among those over 75 years old, about 5% have had an MI with little or no history of symptoms.[11] An MI may cause heart failure, an irregular heartbeat, cardiogenic shock, or cardiac arrest.[2][3] Most MIs occur due to coronary artery disease.[2] Risk factors include high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, lack of exercise, obesity, high blood cholesterol, poor diet, and excessive alcohol intake, among others.[4][5] The complete blockage of a coronary artery caused by a rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque is usually the underlying mechanism of an MI.[2] MIs are less commonly caused by coronary artery spasms, which may be due to cocaine, significant emotional stress, and extreme cold, among others.[12][13] A number of tests are useful to help with diagnosis, including electrocardiograms (ECGs), blood tests, and coronary angiography.[6] An ECG, which is a recording of the heart’s electrical activity, may confirm an ST elevation MI (STEMI) if ST elevation is present.[7][14] Commonly used blood tests include troponin and less often creatine kinase MB.[6] Treatment of an MI is time-critical.[15] Aspirin is an appropriate immediate treatment for a suspected MI.[8] Nitroglycerin or opioids may be used to help with chest pain; however, they do not improve overall outcomes.[7][8] Supplemental oxygen should be used in those with low oxygen levels or shortness of breath.[8] In a STEMI, treatments attempt to restore blood flow to the heart, and include percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), where the arteries are pushed open and may be stented, or thrombolysis, where the blockage is removed using medications.[7] People who have a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) are often managed with the blood thinner heparin, with the additional use of PCI in those at high risk.[8] In people with blockages of multiple coronary arteries and diabetes, coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) may be recommended rather than angioplasty.[16] After an MI, lifestyle modifications, along with long term treatment with aspirin, beta blockers, and statins, are typically recommended.[7] Worldwide, about 15.9 million myocardial infarctions occurred in 2015.[9] More than 3 million people had an ST elevation MI and more than 4 million had an NSTEMI.[17] STEMIs occur about twice as often in men as women.[18] About one million people have an MI each year in the United States.[2] In the developed world the risk of death in those who have had an STEMI is about 10%.[7] Rates of MI for a given age have decreased globally between 1990 and 2010.[19] In 2011, AMI was one of the top five most expensive conditions during inpatient hospitalizations in the US, with a cost of about $11.5 billion for 612,000 hospital stays.[20] Myocardial infarction (MI) refers to tissue death (infarction) of the heart muscle (myocardium) Continue reading

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Myocardial Infarction: Practice Essentials, Background …

Posted: at 1:44 am

[Guideline] Amsterdam EA, Wenger NK, Brindis RG, Casey DE Jr, Ganiats TG, Holmes DR Jr, et al. Continue reading

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ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction – verywell.com

Posted: at 1:44 am

ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is the term cardiologists use to describe a classic heart attack. It is one type of myocardial infarction in which a part of the heart muscle (myocardium) has died due to the obstruction of blood supply to the area. The ST segment refers to the flat section of an electrocardiogram (ECG) reading and represents the interval between jagged heartbeats. Continue reading

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AndrewMcCulloch – Cardiac Mechanics Research Group

Posted: at 1:44 am

Distinguished ProfessorDepartment of BioengineeringAdjunct Distinguished ProfessorDepartment of MedicineUniversity of California San Diego9500 Gilman DriveLa Jolla, CA92093-0412 Email: Dr. Andrew McCulloch is Distinguished Professor of Bioengineering and Medicine at the University of California San Diego, where he joined the faculty in 1987. Continue reading

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Dor procedure – Wikipedia

Posted: at 1:44 am

The Dor procedure is a medical technique used as part of heart surgery and originally introduced by the French cardiac surgeon Vincent Dor (b.1932).[1] It is also known as endoventricular circular patch plasty (EVCPP). In 1985, Dor introduced EVCPP as a viable method for restoring a dilated left ventricle (LV) to its normal, elliptical geometry. The Dor procedure uses a circular suture and a Dacron patch to correct LV aneurysms and exclude scarred parts of the septum and ventricular wall and would prove to be the best option amongst the other methods of ventricular remodeling, i.e. Continue reading

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Cardiac MR PET CT Program – Massachusetts General Hospital …

Posted: at 1:44 am

Kuyumcu G, Salazar GM, Prabhakar AM, Ganguli S. Minimally invasive treatments for perforator vein insufficiency. Continue reading

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Cerebral Palsy – Learn Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment

Posted: at 1:44 am

Cerebral palsy (CP) is a blanket term for several disorders that affect normal, healthy movement. Over 10,000 children are diagnosed each year.Cerebral Palsy Defined Cerebral palsy (commonly referred to as CP) affects normal movement in different parts of the body and has many degrees of severity. Continue reading

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Cerebral palsy – Diagnosis and treatment – Mayo Clinic

Posted: at 1:44 am

Diagnosis If your family doctor or pediatrician suspects your child has cerebral palsy, he or she will evaluate your child’s signs and symptoms, review your child’s medical history, and conduct a physical evaluation. Your doctor may refer you to a specialist trained in treating children with brain and nervous system conditions (pediatric neurologist). Continue reading

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