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Arrhythmias and Clinical EP – American College of Cardiology

Posted: August 14, 2018 at 7:49 am

{{ } else if (‘/~/media/Non-Clinical/Images/System Images/Default/Listing.jpg’) { }} {{=date(raw.fcommonsortdate86069, { predefinedFormat: “MMM dd, yyyy” })}} |{{=raw.fauthorattributionlink86069}} {{=date(raw.fcommonsortdate86069, { predefinedFormat: “MMM dd, yyyy” })}} {{ if (raw.feditorsz32xpick86069==1) { }} Editors’ Pick {{ } }} {{=shorten(raw.fcontentsummary86069, 250)}} Clinical Topics: {{=raw.fclinicaltopiccomputedlinks86069}} Keywords: {{=raw.fmeshtermsvalues86069}} Continue reading

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About Us – Ventura Clinical Trials

Posted: at 7:49 am

Ventura Clinical trials (VCT) is at the forefront of drug development. Founded by Leading experts in Gastroenterology and Cardiology. It is a physician owned company with over 23 years of experience in clinical trials. Continue reading

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Ulcerative colitis – Wikipedia

Posted: at 7:49 am

Ulcerative colitisEndoscopic image of a colon affected by ulcerative colitis. The internal surface of the colon is blotchy and broken in places.SpecialtyGastroenterologySymptomsAbdominal pain, diarrhea mixed with blood, weight loss, fever, anemia[1]ComplicationsMegacolon, inflammation of the eye, joints, or liver, colon cancer[1][2]Usual onset1530 years or > 60 years[1]DurationLong term[1]CausesUnknown[1]Diagnostic methodColonoscopy with tissue biopsies[1]Differential diagnosisDysentery, Crohn’s disease, ischemic colitis[3]TreatmentDietary changes, medication, surgery[1]MedicationSulfasalazine, mesalazine, steroids, immunosuppressants such as azathioprine, biological therapy[1]FrequencyUp to 5 per 1000 people[4]Deaths47,400 together with Crohn’s (2015)[5] Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a long term condition that results in inflammation and ulcers of the colon and rectum.[1][6] The primary symptom of active disease is abdominal pain and diarrhea mixed with blood.[1] Weight loss, fever, and anemia may also occur.[1] Often symptoms come on slowly and can range from mild to severe.[1] Symptoms typically occur intermittently with periods of no symptoms between flares.[1] Complications may include megacolon, inflammation of the eye, joints, or liver, and colon cancer.[1][2] The cause of UC is unknown.[1] Theories involve immune system dysfunction, genetics, changes in the normal gut bacteria, and environmental factors.[1][7] Rates tend to be higher in the developed world with some proposing this to be the result of less exposure to intestinal infections, or to a Western diet and lifestyle.[6][8] The removal of the appendix at an early age may be protective.[8] Diagnosis is typically by colonoscopy with tissue biopsies.[1] It is a kind of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) along with Crohn’s disease and microscopic colitis.[1] Dietary changes, such as maintaining a high-calorie diet or lactose-free diet, may improve symptoms.[1] Several medications are used to treat symptoms and bring about and maintain remission, including aminosalicylates such as mesalazine or sulfasalazine, steroids, immunosuppressants such as azathioprine, and biological therapy.[1] Removal of the colon by surgery may be necessary if the disease is severe, does not respond to treatment, or if complications such as colon cancer develop.[1] Removal of the colon and rectum can cure the disease.[1][8] Together with Crohn’s disease, about 11.2 million people were affected as of 2015.[9] Each year it newly occurs in 1 to 20 per 100,000 people, and 5 to 500 per 100,000 individuals are affected.[6][8] The disease is more common in North America and Europe than other regions.[8] Often it begins in people aged 15 to 30 years, or among those over 60.[1] Males and females appear to be affected in equal proportions.[6] It has also become more common since the 1950s.[6][8] Together, ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease affect approximately a million people in the United States.[10] With appropriate treatment the risk of death appears the same as that of the general population.[2] The first description of ulcerative colitis occurred around the 1850s.[8] The clinical presentation[13] of ulcerative colitis depends on the extent of the disease process. Continue reading

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Cardiac Surgery – American College of Cardiology

Posted: at 7:49 am

{{ } else if (‘/~/media/Non-Clinical/Images/System Images/Default/Listing.jpg’) { }} {{=date(raw.fcommonsortdate86069, { predefinedFormat: “MMM dd, yyyy” })}} |{{=raw.fauthorattributionlink86069}} {{=date(raw.fcommonsortdate86069, { predefinedFormat: “MMM dd, yyyy” })}} {{ if (raw.feditorsz32xpick86069==1) { }} Editors’ Pick {{ } }} {{=shorten(raw.fcontentsummary86069, 250)}} Clinical Topics: {{=raw.fclinicaltopiccomputedlinks86069}} Keywords: {{=raw.fmeshtermsvalues86069}} Continue reading

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Cardiac Surgery – Waterbury Hospital

Posted: at 7:49 am

Waterbury Hospital, in partnership with the Heart Center of Greater Waterbury, offers open heart surgery for our patients. Continue reading

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Myocardial Infarction: Practice Essentials, Background …

Posted: at 7:49 am

[Guideline] Amsterdam EA, Wenger NK, Brindis RG, Casey DE Jr, Ganiats TG, Holmes DR Jr, et al. Continue reading

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ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

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ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is the term cardiologists use to describe a classic heart attack. It is one type of myocardial infarction in which a part of the heart muscle (myocardium) has died due to the obstruction of blood supply to the area. The ST segment refers to the flat section of an electrocardiogram (ECG) reading and represents the interval between jagged heartbeats Continue reading

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About Neuromuscular Diseases – Muscular Dystrophy Association

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A look at causes, symptoms, and care options for neuromuscular diseases, and how we’re leading the way to better treatments and cures. Our trained specialists are here to provide one-on-one support for every part of your journey Continue reading

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Becker’s muscular dystrophy – Wikipedia

Posted: at 7:48 am

Becker muscular dystrophy is an X-linked recessive inherited disorder characterized by slowly progressing muscle weakness of the legs and pelvis. It is a type of dystrophinopathy.[3][2] This is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, which encodes the protein dystrophin. Becker muscular dystrophy is related to Duchenne muscular dystrophy in that both result from a mutation in the dystrophin gene.[1] Some symptoms consistent with Becker muscular dystrophy are: Individuals with this disorder typically experience progressive muscle weakness of the leg and pelvis muscles, which is associated with a loss of muscle mass (wasting) Continue reading

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Cerebral palsy – Symptoms and causes – Mayo Clinic

Posted: at 7:48 am

Overview Cerebral palsy is a disorder of movement, muscle tone or posture that is caused by damage that occurs to the immature, developing brain, most often before birth. Signs and symptoms appear during infancy or preschool years. In general, cerebral palsy causes impaired movement associated with abnormal reflexes, floppiness or rigidity of the limbs and trunk, abnormal posture, involuntary movements, unsteady walking, or some combination of these Continue reading

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