The human needs driving the rise in gardening, and how to start one – CNN

Posted: May 4, 2020 at 9:53 am

This post was added by Alex Diaz-Granados

People are starting vegetable gardens big and small, including a plethora of backyard plots and windowsill herbs.

Caring for a garden can be a respite from the horrors of the pandemic, as it serves several natural desires related to accomplishment, community and belonging and staying connected with nature.

It can get partners and the whole family outside, happily bonding while doing an activity together.

It can also help to alleviate food insecurity as some incomes dwindle and concerns about the food supply grow.

"There's just a greater cohesiveness within the family unit that occurs outside with your hands in the dirt," said Charlie Hall, professor and Ellison Chair of the department of horticultural sciences at Texas A&M University.

"There's not as much eye-rolling when teenagers are told to do something, not as much fighting between siblings. There's fewer harsh words between spouses."

Getting your hands in the dirt keeps you connected to nature while we're staying indoors more these days. The orderliness gardening requires, with its rules and rows, can carry over into the manageability of other life tasks, Hall said. And the calmness of the activity may relieve some pent-up frustrations.

"Your cortisol levels go down dramatically when you're in the midst of gardening," Hall said. "And cortisol is the stress hormone in your body, so you're less stressed."

There's a risk-reward ratio inherent in gardening. You have to learn to balance weather that may thwart your efforts. But that experience bears sweet tomatoes or refreshing cucumbers -- offering a tangible sense of accomplishment when we're floundering around, looking for something to focus our minds.

"You're able to see the fruit of that effort," Hall said. "That's a teachable moment in people's lives."

And gardening may have a fitting philosophical lesson for us during this time.

"Sometimes pruning occurs," Hall said. "That's where the [correction in times of stress comes from]. You prune a plant so that it's even healthier when it comes out from its pruning."

As plants need water, fertilizer and sunlight to grow, we're nurtured by challenge and engagement with things we enjoy, Hall added. And when plants grow so well they outgrow the space in which they're needed, gardeners must replant them in a different space where they have the room to thrive.

"People move up into bigger areas of responsibility during their careers. There's all kinds of metaphors that come out of gardening and how it applies to everyday life," Hall said. "Sometimes you have to be transplanted into areas where you could grow even further."

Gardening can be a coping mechanism during this unsettling stage of life, but it also comes with benefits for your physical and mental health.

Pick the right spot. Choosing a suitable location is important because it affects the quality of the vegetables, the guide says. Most vegetables need at least six hours of sunlight daily, so pick a sunny location.

Plant the vegetables in damp, not totally saturated, soil. If you have soil that doesn't drain well, plant vegetables in a pot that's raised from the ground. You should also garden in a place where your plants can remain stable -- exposure to strong winds, floods or constant foot traffic could damage your plants.

Choose a plot size. Beginners should start small, considering what they can handle and what they'll actually eat, the guide suggests. The size it recommends is 11 rows wide, each 10 feet long. But this guideline is to feed a family of four through an entire summer, so feel free to downsize if it's just you.

Make sure there's enough space between each row to be able to easily walk through to weed and harvest your plants. The rows shouldn't be more than 4 feet wide, as you probably won't be able to reach over a bigger width to care for the vegetables.

You could buy individual starter plants or opt to start from scratch with seeds. But the seeds should be high quality, the guide says, so your money isn't wasted if the seeds don't germinate. The almanac recommends buying seeds from a plant nursery; you can order them online, too.

Decide where and when to plant. Planting one or two vegetables doesn't require much strategic planning. But if you're growing a whole garden, you'll have to think about where each vegetable will go and when it needs to be planted.

Some vegetables, such as lettuce and root vegetables, grow in the spring. Others, including tomatoes and peppers, should be planted in the warmer months.

Plant taller vegetables on the north side of your garden so they don't shade shorter plants. Check to see whether the information along with your plant says it needs a permanent bed.

Lastly, stagger your plantings. Don't plant all your seeds at one time, or you'll have a vegetable bounty that needs to be harvested and consumed in a tight time window. If you stagger your plantings, you'll have a steady supply of food coming in.

Read the original here:
The human needs driving the rise in gardening, and how to start one - CNN

Related Post
This entry was posted in Mental Health. Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.